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Full text of "Constitution and playing rules of the National league of professional base ball clubs"

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CONSTITUTION 

AND 

PLAYING RULES 

OF THE 

National League 

OS 

Professional Base Ball Clubs 
1906 



" I A I. IT i: LIGATION 






PUBLISHED BY 

A. G. SPALDING & BROS. 

1 11KK AM) ( HII M.ii 



t 



Constitution of the National League 
of Professional Base Ball Clubs 

1906 

(Section 16 amended December, 1905; Section 33 amended February'. 1906.) 



Name. 

SECTION 1. This Association shall be called ihe Na- 
l League of Professional Base Ball Clubs. 

Objects. 

SEC. 2. The objects of this League are: 

1. To immortalize base ball as the national game of the 
United States. 

2. To surround it with Mich safeguards as to warrant 
absolute public confidence in its integrity and methods. 

3. To protect and promote the mutual interests of pro 
fessional base ball clubs and professional base ball players, 
and 

4. ID establish and regulate the professional base ball 
championship of the United States. 

Membership. 

SEC. 3. This League shall consist of eight clubs (the 
membership shall not be increased or diminished except 
by unanimous consent of the League), located in and rep- 
nting the following cities, in wit: Boston. New York. 
I.lvn. Philadelphia, Pittsburg, Cincinnati. St. Louis 
and Chicago, and in no event shall there In- mere than one 
club in any city. 

Withdrawal from Membership. 
SEC. 4. Any club member of the League unable to meet 
the obligations it lias assumed may ask the League for per- 
mission to dispose of it^ rights and franchises as a member 
of the League in that city to some other corporation. In 
,<nt of this League giving its consent to the transfer 



of membership from one company to another it must lie 
understood thai the new member shall assume with the 
franchise and rights ot the retirii ny all the 1 i-* 

bilities, responsibilities and obligation into by 

the retiring company. It must also be understood by the 
retiring and new company that the company retiring shall 
.ed or released from any' contract or obligation 
entered into by it to this League until all of said contracts 

and obligations have been fully paid and determined by the 
company accepting its membership, rights and franchises. 

Admission to Membership. 
sec. 5. .\ company to be admitted to membership i" 

this League must first deliver to tile Secretary of tin- 
League a written application signed bj ident and 

mpanied by documents showing that such 

company is regularly organized, chartered and officered, and 

to fully comply with the provisio '10114 

of this Constitution, Such applii all at our.- be 

transmitted by the Secretary to I 

who shall immediately | report upon said 

application, said report • ununicated to the League 

through the Secretary. 

. „?' 6 - I llt; voting upon an application foi meml.er-.hip 
shall be by ballot, a three-fourths vote being requisite for 

election. 

In Regard to Vacancies. 
EC. 7. I,, cage ., vacancy occurs in the membership of 
tins organization during the championsh p 
dent shall nornmate toall the clubs all ap rnem- 

"P,: : "" 1 1 graph 

°J " 1:ul - .:; ill the 

emus will 1 be required to admit any applicant to member 
snip. Such membership, howi only until 

t lie nexl annual meeting, bul 
an in.- rule, and • 

Termination of Membership. 

be terminal 

KnSS 

11, n .,„!:,, 

i.y tmavotdabli 



3EC. 8. 

1. By 



,1 By allowing open betting or pool selling upon us 
grounds or in any building owned or occupied by it 

4. By playing any game of ball with a club that is dis- 
qualified or ineligible under this Constitution. 

5. By offering, agreeing, conspiring or attempting io lose 

any game of ball; or failing to immediately expel any 
player who shall be proven guilty of offering, agreeing, 
conspiring or attempting to lose any game of hall, or of 
being interested in any pool or wager thereon. 

6. By dishandment of its organization or club team 
during the championship season. 

7. By failing or refusing to fulfill its contractual obli- 
gations. 

8. By failing or refusing to comply with any lawful re- 
quirement of the Board of Directors. 

9. By wilfully violating any provision of this Constitu 
tion, or the legislation or playing rules made in pursuance 
thereof, or any violation of the provisions of the National 
Agreement. 

The Expulsion of Clubs. 

SEC. 9. To carry into effect the provisions of Section 8 
of this Constitution, the facts in any e. -1 by such 

section must be reported to the Secretary of the League, 
who shall at once notify by mail or telegraph the party 
charged with the specified default or offense, and inquire 
whether any dispute exists as to the facts alleged. In ease 
the facts are disputed, the Board shall, after due 11 
try the case under such regulations as they may prescribe; 
and their finding shall he final and conclusive on all parties 
except in case of expulsion, when such finding shall }<■ 
warded to each club, which shall tran~.mil to the Secretary 

written ballots "for Expulsion" or "Against Expulsion"; 
and if seven clubs vote "For Expulsion" tin- Secretary shall 
notify all clubs of the forfeiture of membership of the parly 
charged. 

Dues and Assessments. 
SEC. 10. 1, Each club shall pay to the Secretary, on or 
before the first day of April of each year, the sum of $ioo.on 
as annual dues; and such other sums as from time to time 
may be assessed for the payment of salaries of officers and 
umpires, and for such other expenses as may he incurred 
by order of this League or the Hoard of Directors, Al-o 
all fines and penalties imposed by said League or its Board 
of Directors upon a club or upon any club officer, player, 



6 

manager, scorer, or other employe when so levied and Im- 
posed by virtue of, and in accordance with, the provisions 
of this Constitution and the Playing Rules of this League 
2. Upon conviction of any of the offenses prescribed in 
Section 8 as causes for expulsion, the Board of Directors 
may, in the first instance, as ;i preliminary to, or in lien 
of expulsion, impose such a fine as is in their judgment 
commensurate with the injury; which fine may include 
a penalty payable to any other club or clubs as an equiva- 
lent for damages sustained for such violation of this 
Constitution, or of the legislation or contracts made in pur- 
suance thereof, 

Officers. 

SEC. 11. At its annual meeting the League shall elect 
a President and a Secretary 'I reasurer and Hoard of Direc- 
tors, lhe President shall be ex-officio Chairman of the 
Board of Directors. He shall report to the Board of Direc- 
tors any violation of the provisions of this Constitution that 
may come to hi s knowledge, lie shall he the sole inter 
preler of the Playing Rules during the championship season. 
I !•■ shall preside at all the meetings of the League, and at 
lhe annual meeting of the League shall act as Schedule 
committee, miles, said meeting shall otherwise direct. 

Should the office of the President become vacant by 
death, resignation, or removal, the Hoard of Directors shall. 
Within thirty days thereafter, elect a President. The office 
o! President and Secretary-Treasurer may he held L 
same person. 

The Secretary's Duties. 

SEC. 12. The Secretary shall he the Treasurer of the 
League, and as such shall be the custodian of all funds of 
the League, receive all dues, fees and assessments, which 
shall he placed to the credit of the Treasurer in some 
bank of deposil in meel cum 1 I, shall make 

such payments as shall be ordered by the Board or by the 
vote of the League, and render annually a rep,,,! o'f his 
accounts: and he shall give such bond, with approval sure- 
ties, as the Board may require. 

SEC. 13. Tl, c Secretary shall have the custody and care 
of the official records and papers of the Leagu keep 

a true stenographic record of all meetings' of the L 
and the Board; shall issue all official notices, and al 
to the necessary COrrespOl be shall also prepare and 

furnish such reports as may be called for by the Board 






and shall I"-- entitled to such books, stationery, blanks and 
materials as the actual duties of his office may require. 

SEC. 14. The Secretary shall keep a record of all in- 
fractions of the rules and regulations of the League thai 
may come under his notice, and shall make a report on the 
same to the Board at its next meeting. 

SEC. 15. The Secretary shall receive such salary as the 
Board by vote shall determine, and shall he reimbursed for 
all traveling expenses actually incurred by him in the 
service of the League; and the Hoard may exact from him 
such guarantees for the faithful performance of hi- duties 
as they would deem for the interest and safety of the 
League. At the expiration of his term of office he shall 
account for. and deliver up to the Board, all the property 
and papers which may I' into his hands by virtue 

of his office. 

SEC. 16. The Board "f Directors shall consist of the 
President and five other members, to be chosen at the 
annua! meeting by ballot. 

SEC. 17. In case of vacancy in the Board by reason of 

the death, resignation, absence, or disqualification of any 
Director, the club of which he was a member, at the time 
he was chosen, shall designate his successor, and at once 
notify the Secretary. Bui if S'ich vacancy is caused by the 
withdrawal, disbanding, or disqualification of a club repre- 
d on the Hoard, the Board may fill the vacancy by 
i lection in the same manner as provided for the election of 
Directors in Section 1 1 . 

Qualification of Directors. 

SEC. 18. X' hall be qualified to act as Din 

who is not an actual member of the club he represents; 

hall any club under any circumstances, be represented 

by more than one person on tin Board of Directors; nor 

shall any Director sit in the trial of a cause in which his 

club is interested. 

SEC. 19. The Board shall meet annually on the morning 

of tin- econd Tuesday in December, at u o'clock noon, at 

the place where the annual meeting of the League is io be 
held, but may hold special meetings upon the call of the 
President or two up I the Board, whenever urgent 

necessity may require. 

SEC. 20. The Board shall prepare a detailed report of 
all their doings, and present the same in writing to the 



8 

League at its annual meeting; which report shall, if ac- 
cepted, be filed with the Secretary, together with all official 
papers, documents and property which may have come into 
their possession by virtue of their office 

SEC. 21. The Board shall have a general supervision 
and management of all the affairs, and business of the 
League, including the award of the championship and such 
other duties expressedly or impliedly conferred upon them 

wlnf n £ U nT T bv k 'g isl: 'ti°" ™dc in pursuance 
e TrL It W " ' ,C the B0le and exclusive tribunal for 

'on Ht, ,in msm f e ? or |)lr '- vcrs for a ">- violation of this 

din ,1 " r U l ,C " la - Vi " K rul " " r '"'» >r «»« of diS- 

dub Uw ,C K ; ', gut ^ a three-fourths vote of its 
< e and f , f "' ?S 0t , herwis < di«Ct. It shall Ik- the 
b ween driL T ^-"^ t0 !,oar aml determine disputes 
or nlaver of fn t C ," m,,1 ; !l ; Us ^ a club against the manager 
hL own rb b tlU ' r dub ' ?l h - v a ma " a Rer or player against 
sion or evn'l i ^W hy a P laycr a 8 ai "s fi » e - SU W 
President of '"{ " V '" S fnVn «**> " r complaint by the 
Olv^th Vw£ : ' Bl,C aK:il,lst a ch ' b for failure to com- 
diu d a.fi r ,' '° n ^T^^. a "d K^nerally for the 
u V Vr M "' S 'i f law " r f:i< ' 1 --"-i^K °« 0* this 

in^uan"; , thereof"'' 1 * ^ "* " ,h " "*»>■*■ made 

Mich rules'of', 1 ! F ", ,; ' rfl , sna11 adoDt such regulations and 
ofallSu^^^^I "\ e heari "K and determination 
such d sp , •;' 1 ^ n ;" ,:,,ms bro «ght ^fore them. Where 

Played hHiofetSn ^f T l ? a game all ? Red to have ,,ccn 
Rules the cc?m^° *? Con *»tatkM or of the Plaving 
^AlftS a -™. ; anying proof, ,„„,( be 
the President of th J p„ *u *?K " f ?" * aI,,c wi,h 
same to the o\h er e ub w ' "5° ^ f thc 

five days thereafter t£ p 01 ^ "' i,k ' lK atuwet witWB 
the first in>, •;.,,"„, P ™ d «* o the Board shall in 

with communicate h on its menu and forth- 

may within „™ ,1- '^'w "' both dub ». «ther of which 

Board. S < eci i u K ^^ dedsion '" th « ful1 
Proofs, shall tl , n ' K< - lKT w, . th al1 other documents and 
different mwnwfof t^vFT 1 ^ f " r a ««i] vote to the 
shall be final ,d une C r *?% Thc findi "K 0* the Board 
sidered, reopened or ":„" • i C ' rcumstances shaI1 be rccon " 
any subset Ci^ ' nl °' either *» thc L < a * u <= or 

Plaint !.ru\Tr!'r'l l v'' , .; :, H 1 , ll sl,: ' 11 . at on « consider anv com- 
"> ■< Club against a manager or plij 



another club (prior to the expiration of the championship 
season) for conduct in violation of any provision of this 
Constitution, or prejudicial to the good repute of the game 
of base ball; and shall have power to require the cl'ub.to 

which such player or manager may belong, to discipline him. 
and upon repetition of such offense t<> expel him. Provided, 
that such complaint be preferred in writing, giving such 
particulars as may enable the Board to ascertain all lite 
facts, and such particulars shall he transmitted to the Sec- 
retary, by whom it shall at once he referred to the Board. 

SEC. 24. In case a player, under contract with a League 
dub, shall, during a current season, prefer a complaint in 
writing to the Secretary of the League against such a 
club, alleging that such club is in arrears to him for sal- 
ary for more than fifteen days after such salary became due 
on account of such contract, the Secretary shall at once 
transmit to the said club a copy of such complaint, and re- 
quire an answer thereto. On receipt of such answer, or if 
five days shall have elapsed without receipt of an answer, 
the Secretary shall refer the papers in the case to the Board 
"f Directors, and should tlie Board find the player's com- 
plaint sustained, they shall require the club, under penalty 
of forfeiture of its membership, to pay to the player forth- 
with the full amount ascertained to he due him. Provided, 
that should the player refuse to serve the club pending ac- 
tion by the Board on his complaint, he will thereby forfeit 
the benefits of the award, and in such case the Board shall 
revoke his award. 

SEC. 25. The Board shall promptly hear an appeal made 
by any person who shall have been expelled, suspended or 
disciplined by his club, except in cases of expulsion as pro 
vided in Section 38. Such person shall, within thirt) 
after the date of the expulsion, suspension or discipline, 
file with the Secretary a written statement of bis defi 

tpanied by a request that an appeal be allowed him 
The Secretary shall notify the club of the request for ai 
appeal, accompanying such notice with a copy of the appeal; 
and at the next meeting "f the Board the club, by its duly 
authorized representative, and the appellant in person, 
by attorney or by written statement, shall appear before the 
Board with their testimony. The Board shall impartially 
hear the matter and render their decision, which shall be 
final and forever binding on both club and player. 

SEC. 26. Any player under contract or reservation who 
may consider himself unj.ustLy treated or wronged by his 



10 

club shall have the right to submit his case to the Pi 
dent <>f the- League, who shall, after soliciting evidence con 
cerning the maiter. present the same to the Board for hear- 
ing, recommendation or adjudication. The Hoard shall 
have authority to impose any just fine or pecuniary penalty 
on a club, a m •■ a player, if warranted by then 

findings and decisions, and they may impose tin- expen 

trials and hearings on one or both parlies to the CCffltrO- 

versj h fine, penalty and expenses m nitted 

by a three-fourths vote of the League upon appeal duly made 

and heard at an annual i meeting. 

Individual Club Control. 
SEC. 27. Each club shall have the right to regulati 
own affairs, to establish it- own rules and to discipline, : 
isn suspend or expel its own manager, pi. 
employes, and these powers -hall nol he limited to 
dishonest play or open , 

all questions of carele-sne-. indiffcren© nduct 

01 the player that may he regarded by the club a 
aal to its interest, and no. i„ conflict with any provis; 
this Constitution, ,,r tin- Playing Rules of this League. 

Punishment of Scandalous Conduct. 

,„ S , EC Tr 28 ' ''' entofthel all have p 

upon proper pr ,„, 

™^fea fine not exceeding $200 upon anj I 

nto'xt^ ^l'-" 1 publ including 

con r,' R1 'T °f" indecency or other -caudal 

;' ', w t '' 'ing field, during the 

Stir™^' nilated to bring 

Scd.'fin.cm , ■ N: '""-" : ' 1 ^S™ " r National Game 

ahe - car' J', V " rem ",' l '""' ir ' 1 " f Directors 

altera Hearing upon appeal duly pi 

Club Territorial Rights. 

control of ",h, '"i ' ," f ,' 1 "^ Lea « tle sha » b»ve "elusive 

™ ,7 " , 1 Wl,,dl ' 'I- ='"-1 Of the tern- 

™ v M "' h -'">-■ I f five mil 

league ' ,,;'., r '' m !" "^Porate limits, and no visiting 

•fa nv 1,1. in ,, 1, ! ,,,,T *"» "^""stances, be allowed to 

club ■ Wtthtm al League 



11 



Reservation of Players. 
SEC. 30. Each club a member of this League shall be en- 
titled to the right of reservation. ( >n or before the ^oth day 
of September in each year each club shall transmit to the Sec- 
retary a reserve list of the players whose services it desires 
l" retain for the ensuing season, and who are then under con- 
tract to the said club for the current or for any succeeding 
>ns,andin addition thereto the names of such 
players reserved in any prior annual list who have refused 
to contract with said club. Such player--, together with all 

others thereafter to !><■ regularly contracted with, namely, 
players who have been secured by purchase or draft und< I 
the National Agreement for future services shall be ineligible 
to contract with any oilier club in this League except as 
hereinafter provided. No club shall have the right to reserve 
any player when in arrears of salary to him. The Secretary 
shall promulgate such lists on or before September 2Sth of 
each year. 

Negotiating for Services. 

SEC. 31. \'o player, without the consent of the club 
with which he is under contract or reservation, shall enter 
into negotiations with any other club for future services. 

Contracts. 

SEC. 32. Contracts made between a club and its play- 
ers may be either by telegram or writing, to be followed 
within ten days thereafter by a contract in the form ap- 
proved and promulgated by the Secretary to all the clubs 
of the League. 

SEC. 33. The League shall adopt such form of contract 
as it may deem best for the protection of the rights of the 
parti. All contracts must be approved by the Sec- 

retary and duly promulgated by him . whenever a club re- 
leases a player, immediate notice must be given the President 
of the League, who shall, at once, notify all clubs of such 
■■ and for a period of ten days after such notice by the 
President, any Other club of the League shall have the right 
to claim the player released and negotiate for his services, 
and the player shall be ineligible to contract with a club of 
another League. Provided, however, that when a club de- 
sires to release a player out of the League, such club shall 
notify the President of the National League, who shall in) 
mediately notify all other National I .eague clubs of such de- 
sire. Failure of a club to notify the President of its waiver 






12 

within ten days will operate as a legal waiver. If, however, 
a club of this League refuses, in writing, to waive claim, then 
the following rule shall apply: If the player sought to be re- 
leased out of the League is a purchased player, or otherwise 
acquired save by draft, the President of the League shall fix 
the price to be paid by the club refusing to waive claim, with 
this proviso; that the amount so fixed shall not exceed 
$1,000. If the player be a drafted player, then the drafting 
price shall be paid. In cases where two or more clubs refuse 
to waive claim, the claims of the clubs shall be determined by 
lot by the President of the League. In all cases, however, 
the club asking for the waiver shall have the privilege of re- 
taining the player sought to be disposed of, if it so desires. 
The following limitations shall apply to all waivers : (i ) If 
waiver is secured between playing seasons it shall expire at the 
expiration of ten days from the beginning of the succeeding 
championship season. (2) If secured during the champion- 
ship season, it shall expire at the expiration of thirty days from 
date when waiver is requested from League Headquarters. 

Suspension and Expulsion of Players. 

SEC. 34. Any player, while under contract with, or 
reservation by, a League club, who shall without the con- 
sent of such club, enter the service of any other club in any 
capacity, shall be liable to expulsion by said League club*. 
Whenever a club suspends or expels a manager or player, 
that club shall at once notify the Secretary of this League, 
stating the date when the same takes effect, and in case of 
suspension or expulsion, the cause thereof. 

SEC. 35. No manager or player, who has been sus- 
pended or expelled from a League club, shall at any time 
thereafter be allowed to play with, or serve in any capacity, 
any League club (either the one expelling him or anv 
Other) unless the term of suspension by the club has cx- 
pired, or upon his appeal to this League, such expulsion or 
suspension shall have been set aside. 

Effect of Club Disbandment. 
SEC. 36. The disbandment of a League Club, or its with- 
drawal from or loss of League membership, shall operate as 
a release of its players from contract and reservation with 
said club, but the right to contract with and reserve said 
players shall revert to the League, and they shall be subject 
to transfer to such other club as the League may designate 
after acceptance of their said services. 



13 

Playing with Outside Clubs. 
SEC. 37. No game of base ball shall be played be- 
iween a League club and any other club that has been ex- 
pelled from membership in this League. No game of ball 
shall be played between a League qlub and any other club 
employing or presenting in its nine a player expelled, or 
under suspension from the League, or otherwise ren- 
dered ineligible by this League or a club member thereof. 

Crookedness and its Penalties. 
SEC. 38. Any person who shall be proven guilty of 
offering, agreeing, conspiring or attempting to cause any 
game of ball to result otherwise than on its merits un- 
der the Playing Rules, shall be forever disqualified by the 
President of the League from acting as umpire, manager, 
player or in any other capacity in any game of ball parti- 
cipated in by a League elub. 



Umpires. 

SEC. 39. A staff of League umpires shall he selected by 
the Secretary before the opening of the regular season. 

1. Applicant for the position of umpire must state age, 
residence, experience, habits and such other qualifications 
as may be prescribed on forms prepared by the Secretary, 

which must have the endorsemeni of those who from skilled 

and personal knowledge can recommend the applicant for 

the position. 

Independent of such endorsements, however, the Secre- 
tary shall make inquiries and inform himself, as far as 
practicable, as to the merits and qualifications of each ap- 
plicant. 

2. They -hall lie paid such salaries and allowed such 
expenses as may be mutually agreed upon by contract be 

tweett them and the Secretary of the League, subject to the 
approval of the Board of Directors of the League. 

Hut at least ten pet cent, of current salaries shall be with- 
held by the Secretary until the termination of hi- con- 
tract for that season to secure such deductions for absences 
and the payment 'if such thus as may be lawfully imposed 

3. In the event of the failure of an umpire to umpire 
a game assigned to him it shall be the duty of the Secre- 
tary to provide a substitute to umpire such game: and in 
such case there -hall he deducted from the next payment to 
the umpire the sum of twelve dollars [or each gami 






14 

signed to him, which for any reason he shall have failed 
to umpire. 

4. _ It shall lie the duty of each League club to accept as 
umpire for any championship game such umpire or sub- 
stitute as the Secretary shall assign to such game In the 
evenl of the non-appearance of the League umpire or sub- 
stitute at the hour appointed for the beginning of the 
game each club captain shall then select one of the sub- 
stitute players of the opposing club, and the two players 
thus selected shall be the duly authorized umpires for "that 
game. 

5. It shall be the duty of umpires to enforce the rules 
as they are written, regardless of personal opinion as to 
their merits, subject to the Secretary's instructions as to 
their proper interpretation. They shall familiarize them- 
selves with these sections of the Constitution, obey all 
orders of the Secretary, assigning their services and wear 
such uniform on the playing field as he may designate. 

Supervision of Umpires. 
SEC. 40. All complaints against umpires shall he Sub- 
mitted in writing ,„• by telegraph to the President, who 
sua take such steps as be may deem prop .rued 

by the gravity of the ch ascertain as to the com 

pciency of the umpire complained of and to verify, if pos- 
sible by bis own personal observation as .0 bis merits or 

r, = • ?;• c ? >mpl ." n1 '"' for :i wilf "' violation of this 

Constitution, or of the Playing Rules or for neglect or re- 

,,»;,, J™,' a ' ly " l sr '" ! ruIes "'" f " r "2 improper or 

mm' e n', • V f' anRU; '^ " r eonduc « while bating as an 

P- r hinf 11 , up " n "wst'gation ii be wbstantiated, the 
x 1 It ' aVr the ri «'" "' fina ™*>™. sn^-end or 

fS§r. " f,, '"' 1 "■• : ' " >"- iudgmeni the offens. 

Committees. 
pSSaJt'thM S5 : "" u ' aI m « tin « " f *« League the 

Rub -, - , ''""T'/' Committee Of three on Plaving 

,f hree r n r U ' e " f "T "" Schedul « : " 1(1 : < committee 
of three on Constitutional Amendments. 

The Championship. 

t-i! S lfshed 42 bv Vht Cham P io,ls , hi P Of the United States, es- 

ablslK. by thts League, shall be contended for yearly 

b yi£ c IS bs ^posing the League. ' y 

J- l!u ' championship shall extend from 



15 



such date in \pril or Ma> to such dale in September or 
October as the League may determine at its stated or 
special meeting. 

SEC. 44. Every game played between two clubs from 
the commencement of the championship season to the 
completion of the championship series between such clubs 
shall be a game for the championship, and no League club 
shall lend or exchange players to or with each other for 
any game played during the championship season. Any 
violation of this section shall subject each offender to a 
fine of $100. 

SEC. 45. Each club shall play twelve or more cham- 
pionship games with every other club; but a tie or draw 
game or a game prevented by rain or other causes shall 
be pla\'ed off on the same ground on the next or a succeed- 
ing date of the same or subsequent series, whether open or 
scheduled for another game between the same clubs, thus 
compelling double games for said schedule date. If. how 

iver. both series shall have terminated, such postponed 
game must be played 'iff on the ground of the other club 
on a date open or scheduled during a subsequent series 
between the same clubs. 

SEC. 46. Each club shall have half of the champion- 
ship series of games with every other club played on its 
grounds, except as otherwise provided in Section 45 : and 
in all the details of such games, that do not involve the 
rights of the visiting club under the Playing Rules, but 
relate solely to such games as attractive exhibitions to the 
patrons of the home club, the visiting club shall defe 
the wishes of the home club; provided, nevertheless, that 
the home club shall not be permitted to change the usual 
hour for the commencement of scheduled games in its par- 
ticular city more than thirty (30) minutes without 
having obtained tin- consent of the visiting club the) 
under a penalty to the visiting club of $500. I be visiting 

club -hall furnish to a person designated by the home club 

the batting order of it-- nine by 10 ID the morning 

of the day of each game, or the evening previous, if re- 
quested. In ease of the failure of any visiting club to fur- 
the batting order of its nine as herein stipulated, il 
shall forfeit the stun of $10. which amount shall be im- 
mediately transmitted to the Secretary of the League upon 
the receipt of notice from him of the infliction of such 
fine, which notice -hall be given by the Secretary upon 

receipt of complaint from the home club. 

It shall be the duty of the home club to furnish the 



16 

manager and captain of the visaing club with a li^t of the 
batting order before the commencement of the game under 
similar penalties fur default as herein prescribed. The 
visiting club shall have the right to practice its nine on the 
grounds of the home club between II and 12 o'clock A. M. 
on each day of its visit during the championship season. 

The Championship Schedule. 

SEC. 47. All championship games shall be arranged in 
a written schedule prepared by the Schedule Committee, 
and reported to and adopted by the League by a three- 
fourths vote before the beginning of the championship sea 
Mm. The schedule shall provide for an equal number of 
return games, and shall specify the date of each game and 
the date of each series of games. No date in said schedule 
shall subsequently be changed, except (1) by written 
agreement of two clubs from a date fixed by the schedule 
for a game between such clubs to an open date on the same 
ground; or (2) as provided in Section 45; or (3) by the 
written consent of three-fourths of all the League dul 

Any club or clubs violating this section shall be amen- 
able to a penalty of $1,000. Said penalty to he paid with- 
in forty-eight hours to the Treasurer of the League, or 
if not so paid to be withheld from any funds to their 
credit in the hands of the Treasurer. All games played in 
violation of this section shall not count in the champion- 
ship series. 

The Admission Fees and Receipts. 

SEC. 48. [he general admission fee to all champion- 
ship games shall be fifty (50; cents, but each club shall 
designate a part of its grounds, and provide seats thereon, 
the admission fee to which shall be twenty-five (25) c< 
and all division of percentages shall be made on the basis 
of fifty (50) cents, except as to that part of the grounds 
the admission fee to which is fixed at twenty-five (2;) 
cents, and as to such part of said grounds all divisions of 
percentage shall be on the basis of twenty-five (25) cents. 

At the conclusion of each championship game "the home 
club shall deliver to the manager of the visiting club (and 
-hall transmit by mail to the President or other designated 
officials of the visiting club a duplicate of the same) a 
statement of the receipts of said game, which must in- 
c ude all fifty-cent and twenty-five cent admissions, and 
shall pay to the visiting club fifty per centum of said re- 
ceipts. 



17 

The Ball Park. 

SEC. 49. Each park shall be provided with a sufficient 
number of exits and entrances (not exceeding four) for 
the accommodation of the public, and a separate entrance 
shall be maintained for the convenience of the press rep- 
resentatives and those entitled to the courtesies of the 
grounds. 

i. Additional entrances may be opened upon holidays, 
but for such days the visiting club shall be given at least 
ten days' notice of the whole number and their location. 

2. Emergency gates may be opened at any time by con- 
sent of the visiting club, if occasion requires. 

The Turnstile Count. 

SEC. 50. The number of persons admitted to the 
grounds shall be determined by the use of the necessary 
number of self-registering turnstiles, the arms of which 
shall extend within four inches of a dividing partition, the 
keys of which shall lie delivered to the agent of the visit- 
ing club before the opening of the grounds for each game; 
and said agent of the visiting club shall have full access 
to such turnstile, and the box of such turnstile shall not be 
removed until after the close of the seventh inning, and in 
case a carriage gate is used a ticket for each person ad- 
mitted through such gate shall at once he delivered to the 
agent of the" visiting club. The visiting club shall have 
the right to accept the turnstile count for each and all 
games, or to count all tickets. Each club shall be re 
quired to use for its business substantial pasteboard tickets, 
which can be readily counted. 

Special Entrance. 

SEC. 51. No person shall be admitted free to a chain 
hip game, except players and officers of contesting 
clubs, umpires, policemen in uniform, necessary employes 
of the home club, representatives of the press and such 
invited guests as the President of the home club may 
deem proper to recognize, ail of whom must pass through 
a self-registering turnstile at the special entrance provided 
for the press, and said turnstile shall he subject to the 
same right of inspection by the visiting club that is pro- 
vided in all other entrances. 

I. It shall be the duty of the President of the League to 
inspect all ball parks from time to time, and to report to 
the Board of Directors any failure to comply with this 
or any other section of the Constitution. 



18 

Stopping Play to Catch Trains. 
SEC. 52. On any day when cither club is required to 

leave a city to, or in order to reach another city in time, 
where it is scheduled to play its next game, the home club 
shall be compelled, upon proper notice by the visiting 
club, to begin the game three hours and a half before the 
time of the departure of the last train by means of which 
either club can reach next scheduled point in time. And 
either club may leave the field at any time within one hour 
of said train time without forfeiting any rights or privi- 
leges, provided five inning, on each side have been played, 
and the umpire shall be the sole judge of the lime. 

Giving out Admission Checks. 
SEC. 53. In the event of a game living stopped by rain 
or declared forfeited before completion of five innings, the 
home club may issue admission checks good for the next 
succeeding game. If such checks are so i, urd. tin 
mg club shall not be entitled to its percentage of receipt! 
but if such checks an- not i ssue d tin- visiting club shall 
be entitled to its percentage of receipts, precis.dv as if the 
game had been fully played. 

Forfeited Games. 
SEC. 54. A club shall be entitled to forfeited games— 
to count in its series as gan ,. ,,f nine 

runs to none— in case where the umpire' in any champion 
ship game shall award the game to Mich club' on a. 
ot the violation by the contesting club of auv section of 
this Constitution or of any playing rules. In the evem of a 
torteiture for any reason, the forfeiting club shall incur 
such penalty not exceeding one thousand dollars as mav be 
imposed by the Board of Directors alter a hearing held 
within one week fro,,, : , d , .„„, , inv 

damages suffered by the non-offending club .ball be paid 

w.°i, SU ch . P eI,a,l y.- '" addition to the penalty aim 

( \u « llu ;. ca l" ; " n " r manager, or the person in charge 
fnVfh , ; ,f ,;'!'' ,, 1 , M ,, : im «»'' ' for the team leav- 

Lh \ n i sl,r,,l , l,u; " r a Penalty of one hundred dollar,. 

™ ,c pMd w,lhin '"'"■ *0" «" ^ Secretary of the 

,V, g " ' T 1 Pena,ty '!" t '" '"• r,mi,, <-'' «nder any circum- 
Ha«Jfi -v •" : ' , " : - ""'' '"" ■■'' *»« P«<1 "'thin ten 

•;■'; '"";« 'mposed, the dub and player cannot par- 
ticipate in a championship game. 



19 

Drawn Games. 
SEC. 55. Drawn, tie and postponed games shall no! 
counl in the series as game: I but any Kami- of hot less than 
five innings shall be included in the a but must 

he played riff, jf possible, as provided in Section 45. If 
they cannot be played off, as therein provided, they may 
subsequently be played off. if sufficient time exists before 

tin close "f the Season. 

Double games for one admission shall not be permitted 
unless previously scheduled as such or rendered compul- 
sing off of postponed a rovided in 
" -15- 

Winning the Pennant. 
SEC. 56. The club which shall have won the greatest 

rttage of games in the championship series, shall be 
declared the champion club of the United States, tor the 

n in which such games were played. In the • 
that two or more chilis shall have won the same per- 
centage of games, then tin' Board -hill at once arrange a 
-anus hot ween any two of such 
Clubs, such gait! Mayed at the close of the chain 

pionship season, and the games so played shall be included 
in the championship record, ami counted in determining 
the award of 1! onship. Fn such case only the 

visions of this Constitution prohibiting the playing or re- 
cording as championship games, games played after the ex- 
piration of tlu- championship season, shall have no el 

Hie emblem of the championship shall he a pennant (of 

the National < cost not less than one hundred 

dollars ($100). I- hall be inscribed with the motto. 

"Champioi ib of the United States." with the 

name of t|„. clnh and the year in which the title was won. 
Mid lh,. champion clnh shall he entitled to fly the pennant 

until - 1 

Deciding the Championship. 
SEC. 57. The championship shall he decided in the 
following manner: Within twenty-four hours after every 
•natch gam,- played for bip, the home clnh 

II prepare anil forward to the Secretary of tin- League 



-'"in prepare and forward to tlie secreiarj ui u«. • 

rrt containing the full score of the gam 

in* t th< n the Playing Rules, together 

with the dan played, the name ol the 

and umpire, i "' drawn p; ', m ' 

for any purpose except the aver- 
that in any ease where tne 



20 

Secretary shall not receive the score of a championship 
game within live days after the playing of such game the 
club whose duty it is to forward such score shall pay to the 
League the sura of $2 as the penalty of such default. 

At the close of the season the Secretary shall prepare 
a tabular statement of the games won and lost by each 
Club, according to the statement so sent him. which state 
meirt shall be the sole evidence in the matter, and sub 
nut the same, with the statement so sent him, to the Board, 
winch shall make the award in writing, ami report the 
same to the League at its annual meeting. 

In making the award the Board shall consider: 

1. I he tabular statement of the Secretary. 

2. Forfeited games. 

3. Games participated in by clubs which have with- 
in, disbanded or forfeits! their membership without 
completing their championship ith all other League 
dubs, such games shall be counted to the following extern : 

1 ne Board shall ascertain the least number of cham 

><.nsl.p games played by such club with any cluh remain 
nig .11 the League, and shall from the first' game partici- 

tf"*«»i :the championship series by 8 S £h 'retired 

numhe the M T"' S , "' ""* Lea 8«e <=lub a similar 

"ucT rJfi? /1 T-,''":; 1 : '" """''' 8 ames Participated in by 
series P™ 1 i ,'" '"■"- '"' cotmted in ' he championship 

• led'., ,,'l '' 1 ',' l ' at " l Uch retired Club shall have 

le'c.ecl h' y ii eSSt one championship game with every 
m mirolv. * partlci P at «> '" ,J - V " >"='" be throw,, 

Meetings. 

hefd E on 5 L ""' a !"'r''' '!"'' li " K of tllc *-««*« shall he 

,",' p T h ,'"" 1;,v L n December of each year, 

SEC 5Q c Previous annual meeting. 

dent of this fc', mee u mgS m;,y U: ^led by the P 
S Of Sbfclabsf^ °" 1US " W " °P ti0 " 0r °» ««* written 



Club Representation. 

sentej" and £-uT U "J?*!!* each club sha » «* ^epre- 
oTave in addi ion h ^^ t0 , two representatives, and 

presemnt such n ' rou ', "">' "» " s " ,Ws ' jr ex-officers 

send as , VL ' '"^ s; '"" "° dub sha11 '"-' permitted to 

Sgementa? a T! at, i Ve any ] '^" u ""^r contract or 
engagement 1S a hall player or manager, and belonging to 






21 

the nine of said club in such capacity. They shall, if re- 
quested by any other club representative, present a certi- 
ficate of their appointment duly attested by at least two 
officers of their club showing their authority to act, lmt no 
club shall have more than one vote. 

Executive Session. 
SEC. 61. This League may. upon a majority vote of its 
members, elect to go into executive session for the trans 
action of its business, and during such session no club 
shall be entitled to more than two representatives. 

Quorum. 

SEC. 62. A representation of a majority of clubs shall 
constitute a quorum for the transaction of business, but a 
less number may adjourn from time to time until a quorum 
is obtained. When obtained it may be maintained by lock- 
ing the doors of the meeting Voom, the appointment of 
doorkeepers and such other procedures usual in parliamen- 
tary bodies to maintain quorums and dispatch business. 

Order of Business. 
SEC. 63. The following shall be the order > if business 
unless suspended by a three-fourtbs vote of the club meni- 

i. Reading minutes of last meeting. 

2. Report of Board of Dim 

3. Report of Committees. 

4. Election of new members. 

5. Amendment of Constitut 

1 Adoption of Playing Rules. 

7. Election of officers. 

8. Miscellaneous business, 
p. Adjournment. 

Amendments. 
SEC. 64. (1) The Constitution of this League may be 
altered or amended* by a three-fourths vote of the League 
at any annual meeting, or by a unanimous vote at any 
time. Provided, however, that this section and Sec- 
tions 3. 8, 9, 38, 48 shall not be altered or amended ex- 
by a unanimous vote of this League. (2) Any sec- 
tion of this Constitution may be suspended or its provis 
ion made non-applicable by unanimous vote at a League 
meeting. 




*8 



CORRECT DIAGRAM OF A BALL FIELD 




Xmarged Section Showing 
Home Base. 




23 



OFFICIAL 
PLAYING RULES 

t PROFESSIONAL BASE BALL CLUBS 



As adopted at the meeting of the Joint Playing Rules Commiilc "f 

the National League and the American LeagnM, held at National 

League Headojuartaca, M«W York Oily, March 2. 1904. 

Amended Fehruary 14. 1906. 

Amendments indicated by italic*. 





RULE 1. 



The Ball Ground, 
'he ball ground must be enclosed and 



RULE 2. 



ii uiii in unit the players "f 

ihe team not at l>ai to be stationed i\ the 
lively assigned to them by their captain. 
'" obviate the necessity for ground rules, the sh< 
distance from a ft . tand on fair territory to the 

home base should be 235 feet and from home base to the 
grand 

To Lay Off the Field. 
To lay off the lines defining the location 
. j, the catcher's and the 
position and establishing the boun- 
daries required in playing the game of base ball, proceed as 

' f >lIo\vs * 

Diamond or Infield. 

From a point. \, within the grounds, proied a straight 
"ne oui into the field, and at a point, B, 154 feet from point 
*• ay off lines B C and B l> at right angles to the line 
■} B; then, with Ba 63.6394 ' """Si 

utting the lines I! \ at F and BC ai G,BD 
: "ll and BE at [. Draw lii GE, EH, and I h 

w, "eh said lines shall be the containing hues of the Dia- 
mond or Infield. 

The Catcher's Lines. 
With F r and 10 feet radius, de- 

3. jcritx cutting line PA at L ana 

draw lines I. M and I. at right 

and continue same out from F A not less than 



RULE 



to F A 

10 f ott . 



24 



The Foul Lines. 

From the intersection point, F, continue 
RULE 4. the straight lines F G and F H until they 
intersect the lines L M and L O, and then 
from the points G and H in the opposite direction until 
they reach the boundary lines of the ground, and said lines 
shall be clearly risible from any part of the diamond, and 
no wood or other hard substance shall be used in the con- 
struction of such lines. 

The Players' Lines. 

With F as center and 50 foot radius, 
RULE 5. describe arcs cutting lines F O and F M 
at P and Q; then, with F as center again 
and 75 feet radius, describe arcs cutting F G and F H at 
R and S; then, from the points P, Q, R and S draw lines 
at right angles to the lines F O. F M. F G and F H. and 
continue the same until they intersect at the points T 
and W. 

The Coachers' Lines. 
Willi R and S as centers and 15 feet 
RULE 6. radius, describe arcs cutting the lines R W 

and S T at X and Y and from the p 
X and V draw lines parallel with the lines FII and F G, 
and continue same out to tin- boundary lines of the ground. 

The Three-Foot Line. 

With F as a center and 45 feet radius, 
RULE 7 - describe an arc cutting the line F G at I, and 
from I to the distance of three fee! draw a 
line at right angles to V <i. and marked point 2: then from 
point 2, draw a line parallel with the line F G to a point 
three feet beyond the poral G, marked 3; then from the 
point 3 draw a line at right angles to line 2. 3, back to 
and intersecting with F G. and from thence back along the 
hue (. F to point 1. 

The Batsman's Lines. 

On either side of the line A F B de- 
RULE 8. scribe two parallelograms -ix feet long and 
four feet wide (marked 8 and 9), their 
longest side being parallel with the line A F B, their 
distance apart being six inches added to each end of the 
length of the diagonal of the square within the Angle F, 
and the center of their length being on said diagonal. 



25 

The Pitcher's Plate. 

Section i. With point F as center and 
RULE 9. 60.5 feet as radius, describe an arc cutting 
the line KB at line 4, and draw a line 5, 6, 
passing through point 4 and extending 12 inches on. either 
side of line F B; then with line 5, 6, as a side, describe a 
parallelogram 24 inches by 6 inches, in which shall be lo- 
cated the pitcher's plate. 

Sec. 2. The pitcher's plate shall not be more than 15 
inches higher than the base lines or the borne plate, which 
shall be level with the surface of the field, and the slope 
from the pitcher's plate I" every base line and the home 
plate shall be gradual. 



The Bases. 

Section i. Within the angle F, describe 

RULE 10. a five-sided figure, t\\ f the sides of which 

shall coincide with the lines F (i and F II 
to the extent of u inches each, thence parallel with the 
line F B S'/ 2 inches to the points X and Y, a straight line 
between which, 17 inches, will form the front of the home 
base or plate. 

SlC -'• Within the angles at (i. I and H describe 
srpiares. whose sides are 15 inches in length, two of such 
sides of which squares shall lie along the lines F G and 
(', I. G T and I li.l II and II F, which squares shall be 
the location of the first, second and third bases respectively. 

The Home Base at F and the Pitcher's 

RULE 11. Plate at 4 must each be of whitened rubber, 

and so fixed in the ground as to be even 

with its surface. 

The First Base at G, the Second Base 
RULE 12. at K, and the Third Base at H must each 
be a white canvas hag filled with soft ma- 
terial and securely fastened in place at the point specified 
for it in Rule 10. 

The lines described in Rules 3, 4, 5. 6, 7, 
RULE 13. and 8 must be marked with lime, chalk or 
other white matetial, easily distinguishable 
from the ground or grass. 



26 



RULE 14. 



The Ball. 
Section i. The ball must weigh not less 
than five nor more than five and one-quar- 
. tcr ounces avoirdupois, and measure not 
less than nine nor more than nine and one-quarter inches 
ifi circumference. The Spalding National League Ball or 
the Reach American League Ball must be used in all 
games played under these rules. 

SEC. 2. Two regulation bails of the make adopted by 
the league ol winch the contesting clubs are members. 
shall I be delivered by the home club to the umpire at or 

1 , , f C , , "", r , f ,'V ,K ' commencement of a championship 
game If the ball firs, p l aced in pla ,,, baUc(1 / t ,*J, 

out of the grounds or into one of the stands for spectators 

Ln , ,1 Jmls,m ' u of *« umpire become unfit for play 

rte b , l ' a , U . M '- ,IU ', Umpire Sha11 : " ° nce deliv « *e alter- 

nlied in 1, im P ', tC ' K ', r "£ :, "" ,,R ' r k ' sal ,,:i " s,,a11 be sll P" 

tTC In e ,: ',' '"■ 8ha11 : " a " ,im '- S haV « '" hi 

n ,1- i mor « ^emate balls to substitute for the ball 

d iV a " y ° f , ,lu " «««"» et forth. Pro- 

erounH „rT ^ "", ,,a,,s batted " r ,hr """ ""« " f lllc 
Ik etve,, n V, ' *"*! 5ha J' whcn ! '"""-'"" 1 "' ""' WJd 

come d en 1 T**! '"" ," 11 " " n "' in ' i««nedirtel, and 
ion w, ^ ; :' k ■""' -" lon 8 :i ~ he "as in his po 

l, i to ,■ n,or V'V r ," ; " 1 ' ,,!,1K he Bha11 ""• »" f " r » llc ' w 

re ban sb'u ,a " tha1 &■« K " nc '"" " f P>ay. The alter- 

vmel , iev t m"""' l he ba " iM ' ll; '- v '" ""' " r,1 " r in 

«mch thej were delivered to the umpi 

alternate b-,-r , , ,1U '"'' lU ' ly "'""' the ' Kll «' rv "' ««»> ©f the 

-"an on ^ ^7''\^ TT ^ ^ f 
come the i,.,t • i , '"- v - °y ,,K ' umpire, it sha be- 
n " be res,' '," "If , l ' r " vi ' 1 " '• however that play 
I or a T, W ' ,K ' a "" nK ' U - ba " When :l fair b 
contorted J^rli fo >- spectators until the base-runners have 

atTeSnd £ riFS' £ the > compelled to stop 

a second or ,h,rd base in compliance with a ground 



foTtL^rwenfSe voi™^'? 66 " ! d °P t ? d . ^ *• National I,ea* U e 
is used in all Lea*2e conteata^ rcad "Pt«d in 1905 for five years, and 

iwSfitffeS'u, ggSSta "^.V""" " ! ■ - •«•) we 

Played by junior clubs "with thi» hTn ?i ' ! ■""' ,h »' <°" nM 

as if played with the Official U^ Ball! C ° Unt " '**•' """** the ""• 



27 

Discolored or Damaged Balls. 

4. The ball in play .shall not be intentionally dis- 
colored by rubbing it with the soil or otherwise damaged. 
In the event of a new ball being intentionally discolored, 
or damaged by a player, the umpire shall upon appeal by 
the captain of the opposite side, forthwith demand the 
return of that ball and substitute for ii another legal ball, 
as hereinbefore described, and impose a tine of $5.00 on the 
offending player. 

Home Club to Provide Balls. 
Sec. 5. In every game the balls played with shall be 
furnished by the home club, and the last in play shall 
become the property of the winning club. Each ball shall 
be enclosed in a paper box, sealed with the seal of the 
Secretary of the League and bearing bis certificate that he 
has examined, measured and weighed it and that it is ot 

the required standard in all respects, The seal shall not 
be broken by the umpire except in tin- presence of the 

captains of the contesting teams after "Play" has been 
calb 

Reserve Balls on Field. 

Sec. 6. The home club shall have at least a do/en reg- 
ulation balls on the held during each championship game, 
ready for use on the call of I In- umpire. 

Unfit Ball for Play. 

7. Should the ball become ripped or in any way 
n the opinion of the umpire, unfit 
for use. he shall, upon appeal by either captain, at 
call for a new ball and put the alternate ball into play. 

The Bat. 
The bat must be round, not over two and 
RULE 15. three fourth inches in diameter at the thick 
est part, nor more than J-' inches in length 
and entirely of hardwood, except that for a distam 
18 inches from the en. I. twine may be wound aroui 
a granulated substance applied to tin- ban. He. 
Number of Players in a Game. 

The players .if each club, actively en- 
RULE 16. gaged m a game at on,- time, shall be nine 

,,, „ in shall act as cap- 

tain; and in no case shall more or less than nine men be 
allowed to pi a le in a game 



28 

Positions of the Players. 

RULE 17 ,,f !| l '^'' l r,' tl , > " Ul - V '"' stationed at any point 
f the held th< ,,, rcgard . 

that the nitrher , 1 -i • '!'' res Pective positions, excepl 
he tot , ,s . -i i '" ''"' "" " f delivering the ball to 
?o Sthe^SS.™ 1 " T""" ; " defined »' R »'" 9 and 

ever the pitcher deliveTsfftall'o ™« >»se. when 

Must Not Mingle With Spectators. 

RULE 18 , , ,y era '" uniform shall not be perrnit- 
;'" '" occupy seats in the stands, or to 
mingle with the spectators. 
Uniforms of Players. 

RULE 19. ;, ' '," v club sha11 ''"'"i" two uniforms tor 

, S I11 |,I:,}r| ,'• ,"»■■ '" be worn in games at 

*e Suits of ear/ of I i'!"* „ "■' ?**' *" ^"^ »b'Oad, ; »>" 

in color and style y "«*»««■ of a team shall conform 

«0 the -ole „,- l/,'l ,,f,, ' P:i> " r Wl» »WI attach anything 

ball shoe olaie i Y n .'," ; " tl,,T 'han the ordinarj 

forming to the Lit. , 1 appear '" :i ""'form not con- 

M 8 p ™*™° iVt/Sr 1 ■ f hb -"• 

Size and Weight of Gloves. 
RULE 20. „i '' '"' r "^' baseman may wear a 

lv#« '"",>""" ? f ''"> M -"- *ap« ..r « 
Of a glove or mi.t ,; . • Dlayer is restricted to t |,. 

"ring not over , £!!? g m " V ' T '" 

over i 4 ,ncl„ pa , m 

Players' Benches. 

RULE 21. nJhSFu? l Phtye"' beiwhei must I 

mshed by the home dub and placed upon 

ty-five (25) feet n,, m ,u " 1 ""t le»« 'han I 

bench shall he or h °f ' ' >«» «ch 

and the other for ), , t>«l "•"" 

Each bench must he ^ ' 

back and each end • * ",'" h a r "" f •'" ll1 ''•»•'' •" 'he 

f6) inches wide mavK' m " r<- ,lli: 

All players ar ( " ft "J 1 " th e entihtton. 

seated on their teW I s ,° f the si ' ,r « ''•" "" 

team s bene! , he batsman _ tjasc . 



29 

('Miners and such as arc legally assigned to coach base- 
runners. Under no circumstances shall the umpire permit 
any person except the players and substitutes in uniform 
and the manager of the team entitled to its exclusivi 
to 1" seated on a lunch. 

Penalty for Violation. 
Si ( . _>. Whenever the umpire observes a violation 
ot the preceding section, he shall immediately order 
such player or players as have disregarded it to be 
seated. It' the order be 1101 obeyed within one minute the 
offending player or players shall be lined $5.00 each by the 
umpire. If the order be not then obeyed within one minute, 
the offending player or players shall be debarred from 
further participation in the Kami-, and shall be obliged to 

forthwith leave the playing held. 

A Regulation Game. 

Every championship game musl 
RULE 22. menced not later than ;wo hours bt 

nl shall continue until each team 
has had nine innings, provided, however, that the game 

"hall terminate 

<<) If the side tirst at hat SCOreS le^ runs in nine innings 
•ban the other side has -cored in eight intu 

If the side last at bat 111 the ninth inning scored the 
Winning run before the third matt is out. 

Extra-Inning Games. 
If : it the end of nine 

R ULE 23. 1,, 1 mnings for each team, play shall be 

inucd until one side has so 
'ban the other 111 an equal number .if innings, pro- 
dded, that if the side last at bat score the winning run 
' the third man is out in any inning after the ninth. 
game shall termina 

Drawn Games. 
„,,, A dr.-.v. hall be declared by the 

r ule 24. uni pi re ,, ,1, equal on tin 

eve,, inumg played when he terminates 

rain, lire, panic, or tor other 

is 111 peril, after five or 

more equal Ch team- BUt 

,f *« nde thai went ' the bat when, the 



RULE 26. 



Section i. 



m 

game is terminated, and has scored the same number of 

runs as the other side, the umpire shall declare the game 

dratfn Without regard tu the score of the lasl equal inning. 

Called Games. 

riiip 9k **! l ,' H ' anj P' re cali "Game" on account 

" *°- f,f . darkness, rain, tire, panic, or other cause 

-„,v ,„„ ,-, < ' '""' Pal player, in peril, at 

ar* t.me after five mmngs have been completed, the score 
shall be that of the last equal innings plave.l but if the 

of inn ,""' '" 'f < hM ha ™ "*** '" » S"3 nurnter 

I™ 1 !" '"' bcfore llle c '"»Pls<i-.n f the unfinished 

c Z f *"' m ° r 1 T s " lan th " -"'" •"•-■ * bat, the 

£? tes^ ne *"" '" " U - t0ta1 " un,lK ' r " f »^ 

Forfeited Games. 

A forfeited game sna j] | K . declared by the 

umpire in favor of the club not in fault, at 

the request of such club, in the followine 

,-If the team of a club fail to appear upon the' 
hid h "t 1 "," 1 ," 11 ' "" M ' refuse '" h ^>» ■•' P««e for 

ifVssr^iAt ■«— « - <» <»» 

contW J «fiS W ". U ' game haS be * un ' one si<lc rcfllse t0 

"Sed\fte U um1ire the "— *"' *» ""»-" ° r 

^ Rafter play has been suspended by the umpire, 

^pire billed %"T;." play,ng '" ° 0e min "^ : ' f "- r the 

delay the , " mpU * t:,ctics P al P ab 'y d ™B»^ to 

ru&of 5 'the lf «mfl ""$% !* ","' 0m P fre ' n "y onc of the 
Sk , if , b « w, ' fu %and persistently violate.!. 

'h?rked\\ut ^nd^6/TToi "I * V^i as » 
-'. 50 ana 04, be not obeyed within one 

gamTby the f 'u b m n 1rf °*, the Wmoval " f » ,a - v " 5 f ™ the 

neVernSrt \*Z*2 W ^" 

within ten minntes of S^Sl/STj SyS 



31 

first game. The umpire of the first game shall be tlic 
timekeeper. 

Sec <j. In case the umpire declare the game forfeited, 
he shall transmit a written report thereof to the president 
of the League within twenty four hours thereafter. How- 
ever, a failure on the part of the umpire to so notify the 
p dent -hall not affect the validity of his award of the 
game by forfeiture. 

No Game. 

"No game" »hall in- declared by the um- 
RULE 27. pire if In- terminates play on account of 
rain or darkness, Inc. panic, or any other 
cause which puts the patrons or players in peril before five 
innings are completed by each team. Provided, however, 
that if the club second ai bat shall have made more runs 
at the end of its fourth inning than the club first at bat 
has made in five completed innings of a game so ter- 
minated, the umpire shall award the game to the club hav 
ing made the greater number of run-, and it shall count as 
a legal game m the championship record. 

Substitutes. 
Section t. Each side shall be required 
RULE 28. to have pi the field during a cham- 

pionship game a sufficient number of sub 
stitute players in uniform, conforming to the suits worn 
by their team-mates, to carry out the provisions of this 
code which requires that not less than nine players shall 
occupy the field in any inning of the game. 

Sk>. 2. 'Any such substitute may ai any Stage of the 
game take the place of a player who c name is in his 
team's batting order, but the player whom he succeeds 

shall not thereafter participate in that game. 

Sn 3, \ base-runner shall not have another player 
whose name appears in the bailing order of his learn run 
for him except by the consent of the captain of the other 
team. 

Choice of Innings— Fitness of Field for Play. 

The choice of innings shall be given to 
RULE 29. the captain of the home club, who shall be 
ihe sole judge of the fitness of the ground 
for beginning a game after a rain; bin. afier play has been 
■ ailed by the 111 alone shall be the judge as to the 

fitness of tin- ground for resuming play after the game has 
been suspended on account of rain, and when It""' ts x0 
called the ground keeper and sufficient assistants shall t>e 



32 



under the control of the umpire for ike purpose of putting 
the ground in proper shape for play, under penalty of 
forfeiture of the game by the home team. 

THE PITCHING RULES. 
Delivery of the Ball to the Bat. 

Preliminary to pitching, the pitcher shall 
RULE 30. take his position facing the batsman with 
both feet squarely on the ground and in front 
of the pitcher's plate; and in the act of delivering the ball 
to the bat he must keep one foot in contact with the 
pitcher's plate defined in Rule n, lie shall not raise either 
foot until in the act of delivering the ball to the bat. nor 
make more than one step in such delivery. 

A Fairly Delivered Ball. 

A fairly delivered ball is a ball pitched 

RULE 31. or thrown to the bat by the pitcher while 
Standing in his position and facing the bats- 
man that passes over any portion of the home base, not 
lower than the batsman's knee, nor higher than his shoul- 
der. For every such fairly delivered ball the umpire shall 
call one strike. 

An Unfairly Delivered Ball. 

An unfairly delivered ball is a ball de- 
RULE 32. livcred to the bat by the pitcher while 
standing in his position and facing the bats- 
man that does not pass over any portion of the home base 
between the batsman's shoulder and knee. For every un- 
fairly delivered ball the umpire shall call one ball. 

Delaying the Game. 
SECTION I. If, after the bat-man be 
RULE 33. standing in his proper position ready to 
Strike at a pitched ball, the ball be thrown 
by the pitcher to any player other than the catcher when 
in the catcher's lines and within 10 feet of the horn. 
(except in an attempt to retire a base runner), each ball 
so thrown shall be called a ball. 

Sec. 2. The umpire shall call a ball on the pitcher each 
time he delays the game by failing to deliver the ball to 
the batsman for a longer period than 20 seconds, excepting 
that at the commencement of each inning, or when a pitch- 
er relieves another, the pitcher may occupy one minute in 
delivering not to exceed five balls to the catcher or an 
mnelder, during which time play shall be suspended. 



■■■^^^■Hi 



m 



33 

Balking. 
A balk shall be: 
RULE 34. SECTION i. Any motion made by the 
pitcher while in position to deliver the ball 
to the bat Without delivering it, or to throw to first base 
when occupied by a base runner without completing the 
throw. 

Sec 2. Throwing the ball by the pitcher to any base to 
catch the base runner without Stepping directly toward 
such base in the act of making such throw. 

Sec 3. Any delivery of the ball to the bat by the pitcher 
while either foot is back of the pitcher's plate. 

Sec. 4. Any delivery of the ball to the bat by the pitch- 
er while he is not facing the batsman. 

Sec 5. Any motion in delivering the ball to the bat by 
the pitcher while not in the position defined by Rule 30. 

Sec 6. Holding of the ball by the pitcher so long as, in 
the opinion of the umpire, to u inecessanb delay the game. 

SEC. 7. Making any motion to pitch while standing in his 
ion without having the ball in his possession. 

Ski. .S Making anj motion of the arm, shoulder, hip or 
body the pitcher habitually makes in lu^ met hod ,if delivery, 
without immediately delivering the ball to the bat. 

SEC 9. Delivery of the ball to the hat when the catchei 
is standing outside the lines of the catcher's position as 
defined in Rule 3. 

If the pitcher shall fail lo comply with the requirements 
of any section of this rule, the umpire shall call a "balk." 

Dead Ball. 

A dead ball is a ball delivered to the bat 
RULE 35. by the pitcher, not struck at by the bats- 
man, that touches any part of the bats- 
man's person or clothing while standing in his position, 
or that before passing or getting beyond the control of the 
catcher touches any part of the clothing or person of the 
umpire while he is on foul ground. 

Ball Not in Play. 
In case of a foul strike, foul hit ball not 
RULE 36. legally caught, 'had ball, or a fair hit ball 
touching a base runner, the ball shall not 
I.e considered in play until it he held by the pitcher stand- 
ing in his position, and the umpire shall have called 
"Play." 






34 



Block Balls. 
Section i. A block is a batted or thrown 
RULE 37. ball that is touched, stopped or handled 
by a person not engaged in the game. 
Sec. 2. Whenever a block occurs the umpire shall de- 
clare it, and base runners may run the bases without 
liability to be put out until the ball has been returned to 
and held by the pitcher in his position. 

Sec. 3. If the person not engaged in the game should 
retain possession of a blocked ball, or throw or kick it 
beyond the reach of the fielders, the umpire shall call 
"Time" and require each base runner to stop at the base 
last touched by him until the ball be returned to the pitcher 
in his position and the umpire shall have called "Play." 

THE BATTING RULES. 
The Batsman's Position. 
Each player of the side at bat shall be- 
RULE 38. come the batsman and must take his posi- 
tion within the batsman's lines (as defined 
in Rule 8) in the order that his name appears in his 
team's batting list. 

The Order of Batting. 
The batting order of each team must be 
RULE 39. delivered before the game by its captain to 
the umpire who shall submit it to the in- 
spection of the captain of the other side. The batting order 
delivered to the umpire must be followed throughout the 
game unless a player be substituted for another, in which 
case the substitute must take the place in the batting order 
of the retired player. 

The First Batsman in an Inning. 

After the first inning the first striker in 
RULE 40. each inning shall be the batsman whose 
name follows that of the last man who 
completed his "time at bat" in the preceding inning. 

Players Belong on Bench. 
When a side goes to the bat its players 
RULE 41. must immediately seat themselves on the 
bench assigned to them as defined in Rule 
21, and remain there until their side is put out, except 
when called to the bat or to act as coachers or substitute 
base runners. 



35 

Reserved for Umpire, Catcher and Batsman. 

No player of the side "at bat," except the 
RULE 42. batsman, shall occupy any portion of the 
space within the catcher's lines as defined 
in Rule 3. The triangular space back of the home base is 
reserved for the exclusive use of the umpire, catcher and 
batsman, and the umpire must prohibit any player of the 
side "at bat" from crossing the same at any time while the 
ball is in the hands of the pitcher or catcher or passing 
between them while standing in their positions. 

Fielder Has Right of Way. 

The players of the side at bat must 
RULE 43. speedily abandon their bench and hasten 
to another part of the field when by remain- 
ing upon or near it they or any of them would interfere 
with a fielder in an attempt to catch or handle a thrown 
ball. 

THE BATTING RULES. 
A Fair Hit. 

A fair hit is a legally batted ball that 
RULE 44. settles on fair ground between home and 
first base or between home and third 
base or that is on fair ground when bounding to the out- 
field past first or third base or that first falls on fair terri- 
tory beyond first or third base or that touches the person 
of the umpire or a player while on fair ground. 



A Foul Hit. 

A foul hit is a legally batted ball that 
RULE 45. settles on foul territory between home and 
first base or home and third base, or i li.it 
bounds past first or third base on foul territory or that 
falls on foul territory beyond first or third base or touches 
the person of the umpire or a player while on foul ground. 






A Foul Tip. 

A foul tip is a ball batted by the bats- 
RULE 46. man while standing within the lines of his 
position, that goes sharp and direct from 
the bat to the catcher's hands and is legally caught. 



36 

A Bunt Hit. 
A bunt hit i- a legally batted ball, not 
swung at, t mt met with the bat and tapped 
,, slowly within the infield by the batsman. 

it the attempt to hunt result in a tout not legally caught, a 
strike shall he called by the umpire. 



RULE 47. 



Balls Batted Outside the Ground. 
Rill P ao SeCTIOH i. When a batted ball passes 

«uLt 48. outside the ground or into a stand the um- 
i ■, j ,) ' ro sna U decii iig to 

wnere it disappears fro,,, the umpire s 
■ bfc( - -'• p tair battel h;,i] thai ce or 

ml " a stand shall entitle the batsman to a home run unless 
'! . sll ""Id pa i out (if the ground or in I at a less 

jusunce than two hundred and thirty five (235) feel f r "'" 
ne nome base, in which case the batsman shall be enti 
only. Thi 
1 >■'>" 235 feel from the home base shall be plainly 
'ted by a white or black sign or mark for the um- 
pire s guidance. 

Strikes. 

rim c a« A 5lrik '' 

uu 49 - Section i. a pitched ball struck at by 
the batsman « it] luching hi 

arc. 2. A fair ball legal!} I by the pitcher at 

winch the batsman 

p» ■ .!• A foul hit ball not 
batsman ha 

Sec 4. An . which results in a foul not 

''■gaily eaught. 

I ball, at which the bat Milan Mrik' 

misses and which on. 

'': A foul tip. held by the catcher, while stand- 
ing within the lin, 



RULE 50. 



Foul Strike. 

is a ball ■ the 

feet is 



. , , le the lines of the 

batsman s p 



37 

When Batsman is Out. 

The batsman is out : 
RULE 51. Section i. If he fail lo take his position 1 

at the bai in the order in which his name 
is .in the batting lis) unless the error be discovered and 
the proper batsman replace him I time "at b 

recorded, in which case, the balls and strikes called must 
he counted in the time "at bat" of the proper batsman. 
But only the proper batsman shall be declared nut, and 
no runs shall be -.cured or bases run because of any act 
of the imp tsman. Provided, this rule shall nol be 

enforced unless the oul be declared before the ball be de- 
livered to the succeeding batsman. Should the batsman 
declared out under tins section be the third ham! out and 
his side be thereby put out. the proper batsman in the next 
inning shall be the player who would have come to hat 
had the players been pui oul by ordinary play in the pre- 
ceding inning. 

Sic ->. If he fail to lake his position within one mmute 
•'liter the umpire has called for the halsman. 

Si... 3. If he make a foul hit other than a foul tip 

defined in Rule 41., and the ball be momentarily held by a 
tidd. 1 touching the ground; provided, it be not 

eauglit in a fielder's cap. protector, pocket or other part of 
his uniform, or strike some obj.ee) other than a fielder be- 
fore IniiiR caught 
Sec. j. If he make a foul strike, as denned in Rule 50. 

S» . 5. If he attempt to hinder the catcher from fielding 

or throwing the ball by stepping outside the lines of the 

tructing or interfer- 
ing with that playi 

Sec. 6. If, while first base be occupied by inner, 

three tril on him by the umpire, unless two 

St.. 7. [f, while attempting a third strike, the 
touch any part of the batsman'* person, in which case base 

runners occupying bases shall not advance as prescribed 
m Rule j5 > Section i. . , 

SEC & If. before two hands are out, while first and 
second or firs) and third bases are occupied, he 

hit a fly ball, other than a line drive, thai can be handled 
by an lnfi. In such case the umpire shall, as soon as 

the ball be hit declare it an infield or outfield hit. 

SEC. 0. If the third strike be called in accordance with 
Sections 1 or 5 of Rule 49. 



38 

Batsman Must Obey Call. 

Sec. fo. The moment a batsman's term at bat ends, the 
umpire shall call for the batsman next in order to leave 
his seal on the bench and take his position at the bat. and 
no player of the batting side shall leave his seat on the 
bench until so called to bat. except to become a coacher 
or substitute base runner, to take the place of a player 
on his team's batting list, to comply with the umpire's 
order to leave the field or to make way for a fielder. 



BASE RUNNING RULES. 
Legal Order of Bases. 
The Base Runner must touch each base 
RULE 52. in legal order, viz., First, Second, Third 

and Home Bases; and when obliged to re- 
turn while the ball is in play, must retouch the base or 
bases in reverse order. He can only acquire the right to a 
base by touching it. before having been put out, and shall 
then be entitled to hold such base until he has legally 
touched the next base in order, or has been legally forced 
to vacate it for a succeeding base runner. However, no 
base runner shall score a run to count in the game ahead 
of the has.- runner preceding him in the batting order, if 
there be such preceding base runner who has not been put 
out in that inning. 



When the Batsman Becomes a Base-Runner. 

The batsman becomes a base runner: 
RULE 53. Section i. Instantly after he makes a 

fair hit. 

Si i 2. Instantly after "Four Balls" have been called by 
the umpire. 

SEC 3- Instantly after "Three Strikes" have been de- 
eland by the umpire. 

Sec. .). If. without making any attempt to strike at the 
ball, his person or clothing be hit by a pitched ball unless, 
in the opinion of the umpire, he plainly make no effort 
to get out of the way of the pitched ball and purposely 
permit himself to be hit. 

Sec. 5. If the catcher interfere with him in or preVent 
him from striking at a pitched ball. 



39 

Entitled to Bases. 
The base runner shall be entitled, with- 
RULE 54. out liability to be put out, to advance a base 
in the following cases : 

Section' i. If. while the batsman, the umpire calls "Four 
Balls." or award him first base by being hit by a pitched 
ball or for being interfered with by the catcher in striking 
at a pitched ball. 

Ski. 2. If, while the batsman, a fair hit ball strike the 
person or clothing of the umpire or a base runner on fair 
ground. 

Sec. 3. If the umpire award to a succeeding batsman a 
base on four balls,, or for being hil by a pitched ball, or 
being interfered with by the catcher in striking at a pitched 
ball and the base runner he thereby forced to vacate the 
base held by him. 

Sec. 4. If the umpire call a "Balk." 

Ski . s. If a ball delivered by the pitcher pass the catcher 
and touch the umpire or any fence or building wi]hin 
ninety (go) feet of the home base. 

SEC. 6. If he be prevented from making a base by the 
ob unction of a fielder, unless the latter have the ball in 
his hand ready to touch the base runner. 

Sec. 7. If the fielder stop or catch a batted ball with 
his cap. glove or any part of his uniform, while detached 
from its proper place on his person. 



Returning to Bases. 

The base runner shall return to his base 
RULE 55. without liability to lie put out : 

Section 1. If the umpire declare a foul 
tip (as defined in Rule 46) or any other foul hit, not legally 
caught by a fielder. 

Sec. 2. If the umpire declare a foul strike. 

SEC X If the umpire declare a dead ball, unless it be 
also the fourth unfair ball, and he be thereby forced to take 
the next base, as provided in Rule 54. Section 3. 

SEC. 4. If the person or clothing of the umpire inter- 
fere with the catcher in an attempt to throw or the umpire 
be struck by a ball thrown by the catcher or other fielder 
to intercept a base runner. 

Sec:. 5. If a pitched ball at which the batsman strikes 
but misses, touch any part of the batsman's person. 

SBC 6. In any and all of these cases the base runner is 



40 

not required to touch the intervening hascs in returning 
to the base he is legally entitled to. 

When Base Runners are Out. 

I lie base runner is ■ ml : 

RULE 56. Section i. If. after three strikes have 

been declared against liini while the bats- 
man, the third strike ball be nut legally Caughl and he 
plainly attempts to hinder the catcher from lidding the 
ball. 

Sec. .'. If, having made a fair hit while batsman, such 
fair hit ball be momentarily held by a fielder before touch- 
ing tin- ground or any objetl other than a fielder; pro- 
vided, if it be urn caught in a fielder's hat, cap. protector, 
pocket or other pan of his uniform 

Sec. 3. If. when the umpire has declared "Three 
Strikes" on him while the batsman, tin- third strike ball 
be momentarily held bv a fielder before touching the 

ground; provided, if it lie not caughl in a fielder's cap, 
protector, pocket or other pari of his uniform, or touch 

some object other than a fielder before being caught. 

SEC 4. If, after three strike or a fair hit. he be touched 
with the hall in the- hand of .-, fiddei before he shall have 
touched first base. 

Sec. 5. If. after three strikes or a fair hit. the ball be 
securely held by a fielder while touching first base with 
any part of his person before such base runner touch first 
base. 

SEC 6. If. in running tin- last half of the distance from 
home base to first base, while the ball is being fieldi 

first , base, |,e run outside the three fool lines, a- defined 

in Rule 7, unless he do so to avoid a fielder attempting to 
field a batted ball. 

Sec. 7. If, m running from fi- from 

8e«md to . ,„. friim ,, ]jn | 1o hnmr 1);i<( , 1]( , run 

more than three fee, from a direct line between a 

and the next one ,,, regular or reverse order to avoid being 

< ? 1 1 \ a ri " ,n the handa " f •' adder. Rut in case 
a helder be occupying a base runner', proper path in 
attempting to field a batted ball, then the base runner shall 
run out of direct line to the next bate and behind 
helder and shall : ,, im , 

i . , .! f;nl '" ;iv "" 1 '' folder attempting to field 

a batted ball, m the manner described in sections 6 and 7 
ot tins rule or m any way obstruct a fi, tempting 

to neld a batted ball, or intentionally interfere with a 



41 



thrown ball; provided, that if two or more fielders attempt 
to held a batted ball, and the base runner come in contact 
with one or more of them, the umpire shall determine 

which fielder is entitled to the benefit of this rule, and 
shall not decide the base runner out for coming in contact 
With a fielder other than the one ihe umpire determines 
to be entitled 10 field such hatted hall. 

SEC. Q. If at any time while the hall is in play, he be 
touched by the ball in the hands of a fielder, unless some 
part of his person be touching the base he is entitled to 

occupy; provided, however, that the hall he held hy the 

fielder after touching him, unless the base runner delib- 
erately knock it out of his hand. 

Ski. io. If, when a fair or foul hit hall (other than a 
foul tip as defined in Rule 46) he legally caught hy n 
fielder, such hall he legally held hy a fielder on th( 
occupied hy the base runner when such hall was hatted, 
or the base runner he touched with the hall in the hands 

fielder, before he retouch such base after such fair or 
foul hit hall was s ( > caught; provided, thai the base runner 
shall not 1 'in such case, if. after the hall was legally 

Caught as above, it he delivered to I he hat hy lite pitcher 

e the fielder hold it on said base, or touch the base 
runner out with if : hut if the base runner, in attempting 
to reach a base, detach it from its fastening before being 

touched or forced out. he shall fc. 

Sec. it. If. when the batsman becomes abase runner, 
the first b lie first and second hases. or the first, 

1 and third ha e be occupied, any base runner so 
occupying a base --hall o entitled to hold it, and 

■nay he put out at the ne\l base in 'he same manner as in 
running to first hasc. or by being touched with the hall in 
."'■ I i fielder at any I ore any base runner 

following him in the batting order he pui out, unless the 
umpire should hi! of the batsman to he an in- 

field fly, 

SEC. 12. If a fair hil hall strike him before touching 
a fielder, and, in such case, no base shall he run unless 
necessitated by the batsman becoming a base runner, hut 
no inn s |, a |] |„ her base runner put out 

Until the umpire puts the hall hack info play. 

S«C 13. If, when advancing r forced to return 

to a base, while the hall is in play, he fail to touch the 
intervening baft . if any. in the regular or rt ' v< = rse 

"rdcr.as the case may he ha- may he put out hy the hall 
being held by a fielder on any base he failed to touch, or 
by being touched by 'he hall in the hands of a fielder 



42 



in the same manner as in running to first base; provided, 
that the base runner shall not be out in such case if the 
ball be delivered lo the bat by the pitcher before the 
fielder hold it on said base or touch the base runner with it. 
Sec. 14. If, when the umpire call "Play," after the 
suspension of a game, he fail to return to and touch the 
base he occupied when "Time" was called before touch- 
ing the next base; provided, the base runner shall not be 
out, in such case, if the ball be delivered to the bat by 
the pitcher, before the fielder hold it on said base or touch 
the base runner with it. 

Overrunning First Base. 

Sec 15. The base runner in running to first base may 
overrun said base after touching it in passing without in- 
curring liability to be out for being off said base, pro- 
vided he return at once and retouch the base, after which 
be may be put out as at any other base. If. after over- 
running first base, be turn in the direction of or attempt 
to run to second base, before returning to firs! base, he 
shall forfeit such exemption from liability to be put out 

Sec. l6- If. before two hands arc out and while third 
base is occupied, the coacher stationed near that base shall 
run in the direction of home base on or near the base line 
while a fielder is making or trying to make a play on a 
batted ball not caught on the By, or on a thrown ball, and 
thereby draws a throw to home base, the base runner en- 
titled to third base shall be declared out by the umpire 
for the coacher's interference with and prevention of the 
legitimate play. 

Sec. 17. If one or more members of the team at bat 
stand or collect at or around a base for which a base 
runner is trying, thereby confusing the fielding side and 
adding to the difficulty of making such play, the base run- 
ner shall be declared out for the interference of his team 
mate or team mates. 

SEC. 18. If he touch home base before a base runner pre- 
ceding him in the batting order, if there be such preceding 
base runner, lose his right to third base. 

When Umpire Shall Declare an Out. 

The umpire shall declare the batsman or 
RULE 57. base runner out. without waiting for an ap- 
peal for such decision, in all cases where 
such player be put out in accordance with any of these 
rules, except Sections 13 and 15 of Rule 56. 



43 

Coaching Rules. 

The coacher shall be restricted to coach- 
RULE 58. ing the base runner only, and shall not 
address remarks expect to the base runner, 
and then only in words of assistance and direction in run- 
ning bases. He shall not, by words or signs, incite or try to 
incite the spectators to demonstrations, and shall not use 
language which will in any manner refer to or reflect upon 
a player of the opposite club, the umpire or the spectators. 
Not more than two coachers, who must be players in the 
uniform of the team at bat, shall be allowed to occupy the 
space between the players' and the coachers' lines, one 
mar first and the other near third base, to coach base 
runners. If there be more than the legal number of coach- 
ers or this rule be violated in any respect the captain of 
the opposite side may call the attention of the umpire to 
the offense, and I hereupon the umpire must order the 
illegal coacher or coachers to the bench, and if his order 
be not obeyed within one minute, the umpire shall assess a 
fine of $5.00 against each offending player, and upon a 
repetition of the offense, the offending player or players 
shall be debarred from further participation in the game, 
and shall leave the playing field forthwith. 

The Scoring of Runs. 

One run shall be scored every time a 
RULE 59. base runner, after having legally touched 

the first three bases, shall legally touch the 
home base before three men are put out; provided, how- 
ever, that if he reach home on or during a play in which 
the third man be forced out or be put out before reaching 
first base, a run shall not count. A force-out can be made 
only when a base runner legally loses the right to the base 
he occupies and is thereby obliged to advance as the result 
of a fair hit ball not caught on the lly. 

UMPIRE AND HIS DUTIES. 

Power to Enforce Decisions. 

The umpire is the representative of the 
RULE 60. League and as such is authorized and re- 

quired to enforce each section of this code. 
He shall have the power to order a player, captain or man- 
ager to do or omit to do any act which in bis judgment is 
necessary to give fore; ami effect to one or all of these 
rules, and to inflict penalties for violations of the rules as 
hereinafter prescribed. 



44 



There shall be no appeal from any de- 
RULE 61. cision of the umpire on the ground thai In 
was not correct in his conclusion as to 
whether a halted ball was fair or foul, a base runner safe 
or out, a pitched ball a strike or ball, or on any other 
play involving accuracy of judgment, and no decision ren- 
dered by him shall be reversed, except that he be con- 
vinced that it is in violation of one (if these rules. The 
captain shall alone have the right to protest against a 
decision and seek its reversal on a claim that it is in con- 
flict with a section of these rules. 

Must Not Question Decisions. 

Under DO circumstances shall a captain 
RULE 62. or player dispute the accuracy oi the um- 
pire's judgment and decision on a play. 

Clubs Can Not Change Umpire. 

The umpire can not be changed during a 

championship game by the consent of the 

contesting clubs unless the official in charge 

be incapacitated from service by injury or 111— 



RULE 63. 

of the field 

ness. 



Penalties for Violations of the Rules. 

In all cases of violation of these rules, by 
RULE 64. either a player or manager, the penally for 
the first offense shall be a fine by the um- 
pire of $5.00. and. for a second offense, prompt removal 
of the offender from the game or grounds, followed by 
a period of such suspension from actual service in the club 
as the president of the League may fix. 

Umpire to Report Violations of the Rules. 

The umpire shall within twelve hour? 
RULE 65. after fining or removing a player from the 

game, forward to the presid i report of 
the penalty inflicted and the cause then fi 

Immediately Upon being informed by the 
RULE 66. umpire that a fine has been imposed upon 

any manager, captain or player, the presi 
dent shall notify the person so fined and also the club of 
which he is a member; and. in the event of the failure of 
the person so fined to pay to the secretary of the League 
the amount of ^aid fine within five days after notice, he 

shall be debarred from participating in any championship 



45 



game or from sitting on a player's bench during the prog- 
ress of a championship game until such fine be paid. 

When the offense of the player debarred 
RULE 67. from the game be of a flagrant nature, 
Mich as the use of obscene language or an 
assault upon a player or umpire, the umpire shall within 
four hours thereafter forward to the president of the 
League full particulars. 

Warning to Captain*. 
The umpire shall notify both captains 
RULE 68. before the game, ami in the presence of 
each otlicr! that all the playing rules will 
be strictly and impartially enforced, and warn them that 
failure on their part to co-operate in such enforcement 
will result in offenders being fined, and, if necessary to 
preserve discipline, debarred from the game. 

On Ground Rules. 
Before the commencement of a game the 
RULE 69. umpire shall see that the rules governing 
all the materials of the game are strictly 
observed. He shall ask the captain of the home club 
whether there are any special ground rules, and if there 
lie he shall acquaint himself with them, advise the cap- 
tain of the visiting team of their scope and see that each 
is duly enforced, provided that it does not conflict with 
any of these rules. 

Official Announcements. 

The umpire shall call "Play" at the hour 
RULE 70. appointed for the beginning of a game, an- 
nounce "Time" at its legal interruption 
and declare "Game" at its legal termination. 
Suspension of Play. 

The umpire shall suspend play for the 
RULE 71. following, causes : 

I. If rain fall so heavily as to cause the 
spectators on the open held and open stands to seek shelter, 
in which case he shall note the time of suspension, and 
should rain fall continuously for thirty minutes thereafter 
he shall terminate the game. 

2. In case of an accident which incapacitates him or a 
plaver from service in the field, or in order to remove 






46 

from the grounds any player or spectator who has violated 
the rules, or in case of fire, panic or other extraordinary 
circumstances. 

Call of Time. 
In suspending play from any legal cause 
RULE 72. the umpire shall call "Time"; when he call? 
"Time," play shall be suspended until hr 
calls "Play" again, and during the interim no player shall 
be put out, base be run or run be scored. "Time" shall 
not be called by the umpire until the ball be held by the 
pitcher while standing in his position. 

Decisions on Balls and Strikes. 

The umpire shall call and count as a 
RULE 73. "ball" any unfair ball delivered by the 
pitcher to the batsman. He shall also call 
and count as a "strike" any fairly delivered ball which 
passes over any portion of the home base, and within the 
batsman's legal range as defined in Rule 31, whether struck 
at or not by the batsman: or a foul lip which is caught 
by the catcher standing within the lines of his position, 
within 10 feet of the home base; or which, after being 
struck at and not hit, strike the person of the batsman; 
or when the ball be bunted foul by the batsman; or any 
foul hit ball not caught on the By unless the batsman has 
two strikes, provided, however, that a pitched ball shall 
not be called or counted a "hall" or "strike" by the umpire 
until it has passed the home plate. 

If but one umpire be assigned, his duties 
RULE 74. ; U id jurisdiction shall extend t<> all points, 
and he shall he permitted to take his stand 
iii any part of the field that in his opinion will best enable 
him to discbarge his duties. If two umpires he assigned 
10 a game, the assistant umpire shall decide all plays at 
first and second hases. 



RULE 75. 



Field Rules. 

No person shall be allowed upon any 

part of the field during the progress of a 

game except the players in uniform, the 

manager of each side, the umpire, such officers of the law 

as may be present in uniform, and such watchmen of the 

home club as may be necessary to preserve the peace. 



m 



■■■■ 



■■■■i 



47 

No manager, captain or player shall ad- 
RULE 76. dress the spectators during a game except 
in reply to a request for information about 
the progress or state of the game. 

Every club shall furnish sufficient police 
I RULE 77. force to preserve order upon its own 
grounds, and in the event of a crowd enter- 
ing the field during the progress of a game, and interfer- 
ing with the play in any manner, the visiting club may 
refuse to play until the field be cleared. If the field be not 
cleared within 15 minutes thereafter, the visiting club may 
claim and shall be entitled to the game by a score of nine 
rpns to none (no matter what number of innings has 
been played). 

General Definitions. 

"Play" is the order of the umpire to be- 
RULE 78. gin the game or to resume it after its suspen- 
sion. 

"Time" is the order of the umpire to sus- 
RULE 79. pend play. Such suspension must not ex- 
tend beyond the day. 

"Game" is the announcement of the urn- 
RULE 80. pire that the game is terminated. 

"An inning" is the term at bat of the 
RULE 81. nine players representing a club in a game 
and is completed when three of such play- 
ers have been legally put out 

"A Time at Bat" is the term at bat of a 
RULE 82. batsman. It begins when he takes his po- 
sition, and continues until he is put out 
or becomes a base runner. Rut a time at bat shall not be 
charged against a batsman who is awarded first base by the 
umpire for being hit by a pitched ball or for the illegal 
delivery of the pitcher or on called balls or when he makes 
a sacrifice hit. 

"Legal" or "Legally" signifies as required 
RULE 83. by these rules. 

THE SCORING RULES. 

To promote uniformity in scoring cham- 

RULE 84. pionship games the following instructions 

are given and suggestions and definitions 

made for the guidance of scorers, and they are required to 

make all scores in accordance therewith. 



48 

The Batsman's Record. 

Section i. The first item in the tabu- 

RULE 85. lated score, after the player's name and 

position, shall be the number of times he 

has been at bat during the game, but the exceptions made 

in Rule 82 must not be included. 

Sec. 2. In the second column shall be set down the runs, 
if any, made by each player. 

Sec. 3. In the third column shall be placed the first base 
hits, if any, made by each player. 

The Scoring of Base Hits. 

Sec. 4. A base hit shall be scored in the following cases: 

When the ball from the bat strikes the ground on or 
within the foul lines and out of the reach of the fielders. 

When a fair-hit ball is partially or wholly stopped by 
a fielder in motion, but such player can not recover himself 
in time to field the hall to first before the striker reaches 
that base or to force out another base runner. 

When the ball be hit with such force to .111 inhelder or 
pitcher that he can not handle it in time to put out the 
batsman or force out a base runner. In a case of doubt 
over this cla>s of bits, a base hit should be scored and 
the fielder exempted from the charge of an error. 

When the ball is hit so slowly toward a fielder that he 
cannot handle it in time to put out the batsman or force 
out a base runner. 

In all cases where a base runner is retired by being hit 
by a batted ball, the batsman should be credited with a 
base hit. 

When a batted ball hits the person or clothing of the 
umpire, as defined in Rule 54, Section 2. 

In no case shall a base hit be scored when a base runner 
is forced out by the play. 



Sacrifice Hits. 

Sec. 5. In the fourth column shall be placed the sacri- 
fice hits- 

A sacrifice hit shall be credited to the batsman who, 
when no one is out or when but one man is out. ad- 
vances a runner a base by a bunt hit, which results in the 
batsman being put out before reaching first, or would so 
result if it were handled without error. 



49 

Fielding Records. 
Sec. 6. The number of opponents, if any, put out by 
each player shall be set down in the fifth column. Where 
the batsman is given out by the umpire for a foul strike, 
or fails to bat in proper order, the put-out shall be scored 
to the catcher. In cases of the base runner being declared 
"out" for interference, running out of line, or on an in- 
field fly, the "out" should be credited to the player who 
would have made the play but for the action of the base 
runner or the announcement of the umpire. 

Sec 7. The number of times, if any, each player assists 
in putting out an opponent shall be set down in the sixth 
column. An assist should be given to each player who 
handles the ball in aiding in a run out or any other play 
of the kind, except the one who complete.-, it. 

An assist should be given to a player who makes a play 
in time to put a runner out, even if the player who could 
complete the play fail, through no fault of the assisting 
player. 

And generally an assist should be given to each player 
who handles or assists in any manner in handling the 
ball from the time it leaves the bat until it reaches the 
player who makes the put mil. or in case of a thrown 
ball, to each player who throws or handles it cleanly, and 
in such a way that a put-out results, or would result if 
no error were made by a team-mate- 
Assists should be credited to every player who handles 
the ball in the play which results in a base runner being 
called "out" for interference or for running out of line. 



Errors. 

Sec. 8. An error shall be given in the seventh column 
for each misplay which prolongs the time at bat of the 
batsman or allows a base runner to make one or more 
bases when perfect play would have insured his being put 
out. But a wild pitch, a base on balls, a base awarded to 
a batsman by being struck by a pitched ball, an illegal 
pitch, a balk and a passed ball, each of which is a battery 
and not a fielding error, shall not be included in the seventh 
column. 

An error shall not be charged against the catcher for a 
wild throw in an attempt to prevent a stolen base, unless 
the base runner advance an extra base because of the error. 

An error shall not be scored against the catcher or an 



50 

infielder who attempts to complete a double play, unless 
the throw be so wild that an additional base be gained. 

In case a base runner advance a base through the failure 
of a baseman to Stop or try to slop a ball accurately thrown 
to his base, he shall be charged with an error and not the 
player who made such throw, provided there- were occasion 
tor it tt such throw be made to second hi eorer 

it ° ete " nine J whether the second baseman or shortstop 
shall be charged with an error. 

Stolen Bases. 

SEC. o. A stolen base shall be credited to the base run- 

nn Z C " eV fi er , le advan «* a base unaided by a base hit, a 
put-out, a fielding or a battery error. 

The Summary. 

RULE 86 J'" Nummary shall contain: 

Section i. The score made in each in- 
side in the game!" 8 "^ ^^ "* ,,u ' t0tal mm ° f each 
plam'. * Wmh " " f st0,en bases - if an y> b y cach 

each 1 player' ^ nXmAxt " f 'wc-base hits, if any, made by 
each EC player The "^^ ° f tnree " bas e "its, if any, made by 
placer. $ ' "*** """^ of home rUM . if a "y> made by each 

malk'bv JS* 'T*'", " f double ;m " tri P' c P |a y*. M any. 
in the same ^ thc tama of lhe " l:, '' t ' r » assistin * 

pitcner m ' K ' r ° f base 1,its - ' f ^ made off each 

o,|^e\JJ::;,^t;;^ '--.if -y. the pitcher strikes 

base's on\alI ,,C m "" UT °* times - if an * *e pitcher gives 
.he^p'itc'her.' 1 ' 11 " nWnbef ° f wild *«<*«■ if any, charged to 
bat^an 2 w il h h a gS ban" 11 "' " ^ ,he pi ' chcr hitS a 

i£ 2 TteSrfi pas,cd ba " 9 by each « tcto - 

W rr tJ, "f the game. 

sec. is. I he name of the umpire. 



51 



INDEX TO RULES 



TO LAY 0F» THE FIELD, Bee. Rule. 

The ground 1 

Diamnii.l mi ihiii-ltl 2 

Catcher'! ilm-* :t 

Foul lines | uded luoo) 4 

Playera' lines .. B 

Coachers' Lines • 6 

Three-foot line 7 

Batsman's lines 8 

Pitcher'g plate 9 

Slope of Infield from pitcher's plate 2 9 

Tin- bates 2 10 

Materia] ..r 12 

The bimie imxe shape and size of l 10 

Material «t 11 

Marking the lines material of 13 

Tli.- ball H 

Weight hi. I si/... 1 14 

M.i I,.- to l»- used , ... . 1 14 

Number t.. W delivered i" uuiplv 2 14 

To be replaced If rendered unit for play 2 14 

Return ..f those batted or thrown nut of ground 1 

Alternate when I" be pis I In play :i 14 

Penaltj f'.r Intentional discoloring 4 14 

Furnished by home club •'■•6 i» 

Replaced If until for play 7 14 

The bat material and slie .if... 15 

THH PLAYBBS AND TI1KIU POSITIONS. 

Number of players In the game. . \% 

Players' positions 1' 

The pitcher's position '■' ; " 

nil s tatoi - 

uniforms slid si I , 

■ s l"- I weight "f gloves • g° 

.' benches 1 

ill for notice from .upcainK (amended 

1006) .... - -' 

1 Hi: r EMULATION Q \mi:. 

Tim,. ,,f commencing championship gamea 

number of Innings -A " 

"crmiiinii f game ] "- *X 

Extra-Innings game 5? 

Drawn game S?. 

or; 

Forfel game J S 

Failure of a club t" api-ear ' £J 

Refusal ..f a club i ntlnue play f. Zi 

Failure .if ■ clul eaumn play •> Jn 

ting to dilatory tactics ; „ fi 

Wilfully TloUtlng rolei 2 Jo 

DlwiU'.vIng order to relieve player 



52 



Less than nine players 

Second game to begin ten minutes after completion of 

first 

If flew be not cleared In fifteen minutes! ! ! '. ','.', ..... '. ! ! 

T'/r'"""""'" 1 "'' '* '"" 1 ' r "" ] >"' n ' s control (amended 

IJmf lr to rcakt written r, p.-.rt . r f- m Hun 

No game 

Substitutes ..'.'.'.'.'.I'.'.'.'.'.'." 

Hay take place of player at any time.!!!!!! !!!!!!!! 

Base runner -consent of opposing capiat ssarv... 

Choice ..r Innings fitness -f field for plaj (amem 1906). 

Pitching roles: 

Delivery of the ball r.. bat 

A (airly delivered ball . 

All unfairly delivered ball !!!!!!!!!!!! 

Penalty for delay by throwing to bases 

loualiy for delay in delivery to batsman 

till J K I It i^ I 

Failure t„ deliver ball after making motion 

Failure toatep towar ae before throwing 

Delivery of bail while fool is back of plate 

Delivery of I ban w ,,„, racing batsman 

Motion to deliver ball while not In position 

Delaying game by holding ball 

Motion to pitch wliii. .,,i having ball 

Any imi.it,,,, ,,„,, without delivery ..f ball to bat.. 

!>..,„! 1 1 1! -Im, '"'" " ■ etcher Is outside of bis lines.. 

"round ' Im " n '" : " 1 iM Position or ampin foul 

Ball nut in play".'. 

Block balls: 

7 : 'n',',''!!.'"'," r , S1 ", d '" <"■'"•" '"'< '" K""'- 

i n,| in- t,, declare block. 

Base runners t., atop oi r ,... r tai,i conditiona! ! '. '. '. '. '. '. '. 



Roe. 



Rule. 
26 

26 

77 

2!l 
26 

21 

28 

lis 
28 

^ti 

30 

.11 
32 
83 

.■!.■; 

34 
34 
34 
34 
34 
34 
34 
34 
34 

3.1 
36 

37 
37 
37 






Batsman's position 

Order of batting 

First batsman in each Inning! 
Players .,r aide at hat, belong , 
Not t.. Invade apace reset 



'mi: BATTING RULES. 



bats, nan 



a, bench 

reserved for umpire, catcher or 



A fair hit'"' '"''"' h '" l "" v, ' ! " l«'t'Tf.'.r.'.|o'.(. will, 'fielder! .'. 

A foul hit .'.'.'. 

A foul tip '.'.'.'.'. 

A bunt hit Ian,.. ml,., | , ■ ,. 

Infield By definition of 

Balis batted outside ground: 

Fair bit over fence land 

l&ZJtJ&F&Z** m " '"" 

Strlki-s: 

Ball stru.-k ut by batsman 
Pair ball not struck at. . 

K ""'strlk,.s"" ''"'" !h ' "" " y "» lra »"' ; '"""'"'n"lia«' two 
Attempt to bun, resulting.',' foul ' lainenile.l ,-,. ,., 
Missed strike hut which touches batsman 
Foul tip heiii by catcher 

A fool strike 



3R 

:::, 

41, 
41 

40 
4.'. 
44 
4. r , 
46 
47 
:.l 

48 
Is 
4H 

in 
19 

40 
4fl 

n 

to 






53 



TFIF. BATSMAN is ot'T. See. Rule. 

If he fail to take position in proper I urn 1 51 

If he fail to lake position within one minute 2 M 

If be make foul ini other than foul up and ball is caught. :s 61 

If he make foul strike -I .",1 

If he Interfere with catcher.. f> 51 

if. with first base occupied, three strikes an- called i> 51 

If. while attempting third strike, hall touch his person.... 7 51 

If. bef< two ar '. he hits Infield fly ,s ,-,1 

if tblfd strike is railed in accordance with See. 4 or .". of 

Kale IP (amended 1808) r,l 

Batsman must obey umpire's call 10 51 

Till-: BASK RUNNING BULKS 

Legal order of imses - r>2 

Not lo score before runner preceding r>2 

Batsman becomes base runner: 

After 111' makes fair tilt 1 63 

Afler r • halls at ailed 2 68 

After three strikes are Called :! 53 

If he he hit i,v pitched hall 4 53 

If catcher Interfere with him 5 63 

Entitled t" bases (wlthonl liability to be pnt ont): 

If umpire call four halls I f>4 

ir umpire award batsman Mist has,- for being hit by 

pitched hall 1 64 

if umpire award batsman first base tor Interferei r 

catcher i 64 

if fair Ml strike umpire or base runner 2 M 

If umpire award next batsmsn Hist base s 84 

if umpire call ■ "balk" 4 54 

If pitched ball pass catcbei and hit umpire 5 64 

If prevented from advancing bj fielder's obstruction... 54 

If fielder stop or cstch hall Illegally 7 54 

Returning to bases (without llabilltj to be pnt ont): 

If umpire declare foal tip or hit nol caught t r>5 

If umpire declare foal strike 2 66 

If umpire declare dead ioi n 3 56 

If umpire Interfere with catcher cm' throw 4 .'■.'. 

If pitched hall struek at touches batsman 5 55 

When not required to touch Intervening bases 56 

Hasp runners are ont: 

Attempt to hinder catcher afti rlkes 1 

Fielder hold fair hit - 58 

Thlr.l strike held bj Belter 3 58 

Touched with ball after thi strikes 4 56 

fielder i 'hea first base tthoad of ru r :. 5(1 

ice "ill of thr fool lines ••"••; 'j J* 

Running out of line after having reached first 7 5« 

Failure to avoid fielder in a. i ..f fielding t 8 5« 

Touched by fielder having ball In possession n -•« 

Hall held on base before runner can return in 58 

Forced to va.ate I.;,-.- bj sue, ling runner ... 11 58 

mi hi fair hall before touching fielder ... 12 .;'; 

Failure to t. b bases in regular or reyi 3 

Failure to return 1" has,- h. LI when 'tune Was called 14 68 

Overrunning firsl baae '» j™ 

Coacber drawing throw to ,,,, ,, 32 -' ■' 

Members of team at hat fusing fielding side 17 

Runner touching home before preceding runner 18 68 

Cmpire to declai I wlthonl appeal r..r decision .>t 

Coaching rules . .... gg 

Scoring of runs SJJ 

I'oRtiltlon of n "for ill" 



i 



54 

JJo appeal from declalon J? 

Cannot qneatlon nmnlre'i i-SKS 11 "^Tlft «m»t™ctlon « 

Cannot cWge ,„ , ' „„,. "T"' 1 ' ,,f J"'1>mi..-.,i 88 

Penalties r.„- rloStlona * Dn >*™M "' bum IB 

Notification of finea anVi .V,. ', '••"' 

n«P««'» re 1 „ nil , \,1"^ '" g 

Warning to captains m 

ttlann^;!?^ ;; « 

Stupenalon of nl» 7" 

'i>ll "f -tin,.- 1 71 

Declalont ■„, i,„|| s ,„ ;,- ' • • • • • 7'J 

r<« iti.,n of nmplre ,, im.i "- 

DBthwof ^sisi,,,,, SnX:::::::;::::. .:;.::: zj 

77 

"Play" .... ': i:\Kit.u. DEFINITIONS. 

"Tim.-" .... 78 

"Game" 7n 

a An Inning" wi 

A time at bat" "1 

Legal" or ■•l.-j.-j.liv-- « 

83 

ThetaUB • ™ K B00Bnia '"'■>* (W 

Tlmi-a nt 

NuiiiNt of r,,,,, ••• 1 

Flral baae hlta 2 

wm,': :::::::::::::;:: 3 

The fielding record 

NnSber of SaalaVi** "',"' "M^mhM.,,, ..f „ 

stolen I.Hws .. K «B 

rhp mamu ■• m 

Tb* SZXjfitoiSnSJ!* "'"" r,,n " ! 

The number .,r , u , , ... 2 

The aoaber of ', £ .'-, 1 

The Dumber of home run. « 

The „„„ KJ „ f f ^W each „„,,„., ,. « 

The number ,,f iTrtk.. .?, m " rt * n,r «"* HUrter « "« 

Hie IHIfiiU-r . t O M 

™- Kg ::, f &? ■ ::::: w S 

The mimlx-r ..f hit > . 11 

The numb, 2 M 

The „.„,. „,,,,,. J™^ 

tr» ■ 






55 



To Umpires, Managers and 
Players 

The attention of all National League Officials and 
Players is called to the following Resolution, adopted 
unanimously at the Annual Meeting of the League, at 
New York City, December 14, 1905 : 

Resolved, That the President of this organization is 
hereby vested with full and absolute power to maintain 
order and discipline on the ball field, and that he shall 
nave full power to discipline any player or manager for the 
violation of good order on the ball field ; that this discipline 
snail be either in a fine or suspension from the grounds of 
any club. That he shall be authorized to adopt such 
regulations for maintaining order on the ball field as he 
shall deem fit and proper; that he shall have full and 
absolute power to act upon any complaint made by the 
umpire against any player or manager for violation of order ; 
'hat in all cases where the penalty fixed is either a fine or 
suspension his decision shall be final. That in cases where 
ne deems it fit and proper that the offender or offenders 
should be expe'.lcd from the organization, that such expul- 
sion shall not go into effect until same has been ratified by 
'he Board of Directors (the President not voting). That 
'his resolution and the powers granted herein shall prevail 
"nul repealed and that any provision either in the Con- 
stitution or Playing Rules of this organization in conflict 
*«* the provisions of this resolution shall be null and void 
du ring the life of this resolution. 



56 



Annual Meeting of the National 

League of Professional 

Base Ball Clubs 



Held at the Victoria Hotel, New York City. 
December 12 to 14, inclusive. 1905. 



1905. 



Tuesday, December 12, 

Meeting called to order at 2:45 P. M. 

President Harry C. Pulliam in the Chair; John Heydler 
acting as Secretary. 

Present : 

A. H. Soden and \V. II. CoNANT, representing the Bos- 
ton Base Ball Association; 

C. II. Ebbets and II. W. Mhi.h is. representing tlie 
Brooklyn Ball Club; 

James A. Hart and Charles W. Murphy, representing 
the Chicago League Ball Club; 

August Herrmann, representing the Cincinnati Exhi- 
bition Company; 

John- T. BRUSH and F. M. KNOWLES, representing the 
National Exhibition Company of New York; 

W. J. SheTTSLINE and I). LeRoY REEVES, representing 

the Philadelphia Ball Company: 

BahNEY DREYFU8S and \V. 11. LOCH ■■tiling the 

Pittsburg Athletic Company. 

M. S. Robison, representing the American Base Ball 
and Athletic Exhibition Company of St. Louis. 

On roll call, Mr. Hart announced his retirement a- a 
member of the League ami presented Mr. Charles W. Milt 

phy, his successor and President of the Chicago club. 

As a mark of esteem, the League, by a rising vote. 

elected Mr. Hart an honorary member of the National 
League for life. 



57 

The Secretary read the minutes of the Reconvened An- 
nual Meeting of February 15 and 16, 1905, which were 
approved. 

The report of t lie- Board of Directors was then sub- 
mitted and, on motion, was adopted. This report carried 
with it the award of the Championship for 1905 to the New 
York Club. 

On motion, Messrs. W. H. Watkins and J. 11. Farrell. 
representing the minor leagues, were given the privilege ol 
the flooi foi the purpose of presenting arguments for the 
modification of the existing drafting regulations, At the 

conclusion of the remarks of Messrs. Watkins and Far 
rell, on motion, a request was made that the National As- 
sociation submit in writing any changes it desired made in 

the Xational Agreement. 

On motion, a recess was taken until December 13. 



Wednesday, December 13. 1905. 
Meeting reconvened at 1:10 P. M. 

All clubs represented. 

Under the order of business, Mr. Brush presented an 
amendment to Section 11 of the Constitution so that the 
Sentence in lines three and font of aid section should read 
as follows: "llii- President -hall be ex-officio Chairman 
of tin lioard of Directors. Inn shall have no vote." On 
on, amendment was referred to the Committee on 

( '< institution. 

Mr. Soden moved that Section 16 of the Constitution be 
amended to read as follows: "The Board of Directors' 

shall consist of the President and five other members 10 be 
chosen at the annual meeting by ballot." Carried. 

Mis-rs. Herrmann and Ebbets proposed changes in the 

players' contracts, which were approved by the League and 
referred to the Xational Commission for adoption. 

On motion, a committee was appointed to consider the 
matter of uniform tickets of admission 10 grounds. 






58 

Under head of "Playing Rules," the sense of the meeting 

was that the rules at present in force were satisfactory. 

Election of officers being in order. Messrs. Harry C. Ful- 
liam and James A. Hart were placed in nomination for the 
office of President, Secretary and Treasurer for the en- 
suing year. Mr. Soden assumed the chair and appointed 
Mr. James Potter teller to receive, count, and report the 
vote cast. The result of the ballot as reported was: Harry 
C. Pulliam, 6 votes; James A. Hart. 2 vote-. 

On motion, the following resolution was adopted and 
placed upon the records: 

"Resolved, That it is the sense of this meeting that 
James A. Hart, who was tendered a complimentary vote 
for President, Secretary and Treasurer, was in no sense a 
candidate." 

1 he representatives of the following named clubs weti 

elected Directors for the ensuing year: Boston, Brooklyn, 

Chicago, Philadelphia and Pittsburg. 

I be following named committees were appointed to serve 
for the ensuing year : 

Constitution — Messrs. Brush, Herrmann and Ebb 
Playing Rules -Messrs. Dreyfuss, Hanlon and Murphy. 
The League then took a recess until i_> o'clock noon of 
Thursday, December 14. 



Thuksday, December 1 1. 1005. 

The League was caller to order at 1 155 P. M. 

Mr. Herrmann, as a member of the Committee on C01 
ference regarding the proposed changes in the National 
Agreement, presented the propi the .National ' 

ciation for the amendment of Section U of Article VL of 
the National Agreement. 

On motion, the proposition was accepted by the National 
League and its representative was instructed to vote for 
the proposed changes at the next meeting of the Comtnis- 



50 

ft was moved ,iii<i seconded thai when this meeting 
finally adjourn, ii adjourn subject to the call of the Chair. 

The Board of Directors recommended a change in the 
form of players' contract, which was adopted and referred 
to the National Commission for approval. Adopted. 

On motion, Mr. Julian W. Curtiss, representing the firm 
of A. (i. Spalding & liros.. addressed the League upon the 
subject of the renewal of the present base hall contract, 
and, on motion, the proposition as submitted by Mr. Curtiss 
was accepted and the Spalding hall was adopted for a 
period of live years after close of present agreement, and 

the President was instructed to execute a contract with A. 
(I. Spalding & Bros. 

On motion, a resolution was adopted, vesting the Presi- 
dent with authority to maintain order and discipline on the 
hall field. 

On motion, the League, at 5:45 P. M.. adjourned, sub- 
j.-. • t<. the call of the Chair. 









Reconvened Annual Meeting of the 

National League of Professional 

Base Ball Clubs 

Held at the Victoria Hotel. New York City. 
Wednesday and Thursday. February U and IS, 1906. 

Day, Wednesday, February m, 1906. 

In pursuance to a call from the President, the National 
League of Professional Base Ball Clubs met in Parlor 228 
"' *e Victoria Hotel, Meeting called to order at 2:45 
J'. M. President Harry C Pulliam in the Chair; John 
Heydler acting as Secretary. 

Present : 

A. 11. Sodem and \V. I [. 
ton Base Ball \.s iciation; 

C. II. Ebbets and H. 
Brooklyn Ball Club; 

Charles W. Murphy, representing the Chicago League 
Ball Club; 

August Herrmann, representing the Cincinnati Exhi- 
bition Company ; 

John T. Brush and F. M. Khowles, representing the 
National Exhibition Company of New York; 

Wm. J. Shettsline and I). LeRo\ R epresenting 

the Philadelphia Ball Company; 

Barnev Dreyfuss and Will Locke, representing the 
Pittsburg Athletic Company ; 

Frank deHass Robison, representing the American 
Base Ball and Athletic Exhibition Comparrj of St Lonia, 

I be Secretary read the minute, of thi I r annual 

meeting and, on motion, the corn read 

approved, the New York Club, howe ing a 

>"""" lh « approval , ,\ minutes 

involving a payment from th ■ I'r ,,. F U nd, 



CoNANT, representing the Bos- 
W. MeDICUS, representing the 



■■»■. 



61 

the Joint Playing Rule-. Committee having (all power 
under the National Agreement, presented it-, preliminary 
report, which was read and filed, no action being neces- 
sary ( see Playing Rules). 

Mr. Ebbets presented the report of the Committee on 
Uniform System of tickets. Same was discussed, but no 

« taken. 
\t ' > : i< > P. M. a recess was taken until noon February 15. 



Thursday, February 15. tgo& 
Meeting called to ordei at 1 o'clock. Marry ('. Pulliam 

:n the Chair and John llcydler .1 secretary. 

The final report of the Joint Playing Rides Committee 

was received and filed (see Playing Rules). 
Mr. Brush, from the Committee on Constitution, rc- 

ported to the League a proposed amendment to Section ti 

of the Constitution, hut same was lost. 

'iii motii on 33 of the Constitution was amended 

by adding the Following : 

"The following limitations shall apply to all waivers: 
"1. If waiver is secured between playing seasons, it shall 

expire at the expiration of ten days from the beginning of 

the succeeding championship season. 

"_'. If secured duri championship season it shall 

expire at the expiration of thirty (lays from date when 

waiver is requested from League Headquarters." 
On motion, this constitutional change was ordered ap 

plied to all waivers now in ft 

The following resolution was ado, 

"Resolved, That no official, manager or player of any 
League i lub be permitted to issue passes to foreign 
ground ; tin. resolution to take effect with the beginning 

of tin- championship season of 1906, and to continue in ef- 

'■•' 1 until r. pealed." 
I hi ead was adopted 

On motion, ti adjourned, to meet in New York 

I'll'- 10. ii>d6. 



Officers and Members 

The following in an official list of the officers of the National League 
of Professional Bose Ball Clubs, an.! Officers of Clubs. Members thereof, 
for the season of 1906 : 

President. Secretary and Treasurer 

Harry C. Pulliam. 

Rooms 1424-1426 St. James Building. New York City. 

Telephone, 2209 Madison (Long Distance). 

Board of Directum 

A. H. Soden. Rarnev Dreyfhss, Chari.es En bets, 

Wm. J. Shettsline and Charles W. Mtrphy. 



BOSTON BASE BALL ASSOCIATION, BOSTON. MASS. 
A. H. Soden. President. 410 Atlantic Avenue. 

BROOKLYN BASE BALL CLUB. BROOKLYN. N. Y. 

Charles H. Ebbets, President. 

Henry W. Medicus. Treasurer. C. H. Ebbets, Jr.. Asst. Secretary. 

CINCINNATI EXHIBITION COMPANY. CINCINNATI. OHIO. 

Ai»;iist Herrmann. Pi mHi 
Max C. Fleischmann. Secretary and Treasurer. Wiggins Block. 

CHICAGO LEAGUE BALL CLUB. CHICAGO. ILL. 
Charles W. Mi.ri-hy, President. 1115 Maaonic Tomplc. 

Charles G. Williams. Secretary and Treasurer. 

<iiari.es H. Thomas. Associate Secretary. 

PITTSBURG ATHLETIC COMPANY, PITTSBURG. PA. 

Barney DBBCTTOB, President. W. H. Locke. Secretary. 

901 Farmers' Bank Building. 

PHILADELPHIA BALL COMPANY. PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

Wm. .1. Shettsi.ine. President. [). I.kRoy Reeves. Secretary. 

Kl'J-'Jl Real Estate and Trust Building. 

NATIONAL EXHIBITION COMPANY. NF.W YORK. 

John T. Brush. Pmidaut Fred M. Knovyi es. Secretary -Treasurer. 

Room 930 St. James BuildiT.it. 

AMERICAN BASE BALL AND ATHLETIC EXHIBITION COMPANY 

OF ST. LOUIS. MO. 

Frank DeHam Robison. President. 

M. Stanley Robison. Vice-President and Treasurer. 



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64 

NATIONAL LEAGUE 
AVERAGES 








TEAM BATTING. 














G. Alt. 


It. 


11. 


TB 


21! 


SB. lilt. 


PC. 


si 1. 


SB. 


New Y..rk 168 5,094 7 


HI 1 


.292 


1,876 


mi 


ss 39 


.272 


1.18 


21.! 


Cincinnati. 15.". 5,20B 7 


18 1 


mi 


1,844 


nm 


nil : 


7 


.269 


171 


LSI 


Pittsliurp . 155 5,2 


2 802 1 


385 


1,823 


190 


in : 


2 


.260 


169 


202 


I'liila. ... 155 5,243 7 


18 1 


362 


1,761 


1S7 


s 


2 Hi 


.211(1 


174 


ISO 


St. I... Mis. 154 5,068 ( 


;i i 


254 


1.1121 


1 1(1 


s 


-. 2o 


.2 is 


100 


162 


Brooklyn . 155 5,100 506 l 


2."..-. 


1,616 


154 


(lo 21. 


.2111 


120 


186 


1 ago • 155 5.10K 887 1.240 


1,606 


157 


82 12 


.217. 


I'.I'. 


2'I7 


Boston .. 158 5,190 4(17 1,217 


1,520 


1 IS 


r.2 17 


.2.14 


85 


122 




INDIVIDUAL BATTING. 














G. 


AB. 


R. 


H. 


TB. 


21'.. 


3B.IIR 


PC. 


Sll.SU. 


Seymour. Cincinnati 


149 


581 


95 


2111 


325 


40 


21 


8 


.277 


9 


21 


Wagner. Pittsburg. 


117 


548 


114 


199 


277 


::2 


1 1 


n 


.868 


7 


..: 


Dunlin. New York. 


loll 


mm 


121 


216 


800 


ill 


HI 


7 


.356 


12 


Xi 


Beaumont, Pitt*. . . 


:i7 


.•:si 


(ill 


12(1 


1 II.'! 


a 


s 


:; 


.1128 


14 


21 


Thomas. 1'hila 


147 


-.112 


lis 


178 


201 


ii 


• '. 


(i 


.217 


III 


28 


Chance, Chicago. . . 


115 


:i»2 


'.12 


124 


170 


id 


12 


2 


..•(10 


17. 


38 


Ganley, Pittsburg. . 


32 


127 


12 


in 


1.-, 


i 


2 





.816 


8 


3 


Bmoot, si. Louis. . . 


188 


:,:; I 


72 


Kill 


221 


21 


HI 


4 


.211 


18 


21 


thus. Philadelphia. 


147 


.".IN 


:.:. 


111!) 


2.;:i 


36 


1 1 


2 


.808 


6 


11 


Barry. Chi. mid ('in. 


152 


508 


loo 


1S2 


222 


18 


12 


1 


.2111 


2.". 


21 


Slegle, Cincinnati.. 


li> 


56 


9 


17 


25 


1 


2 


1 


.304 


2 





Bresnahan, N. v. . . 


as 


:;::i 


58 


100 


121 


is 


:: 


il 


.2112 


7 


11 


Mat-..-. Philadelphia 


i ;.:. 


me; 


Hill 


ISO 


2:.:: 


L-l 


17 


5 


,298 


II 


IS 


Clark, Pittsburg. . 


187 


525 


:i.". 


I.-.7 


211 


IS 


16 


2 


.2'. I'.i 


22 


2 1 


McGann, New Sfork 


136 


191 


ss 


147 


2i:i 


22 


11 


S 


.ll'.ili 


10 


a 


Clymer, Pittsburg., 


no 


365 


74 


HIS 


1211 


11 


5 





.296 


4 


23 


l.uuil.-.v. Brooklyn.. 


129 


505 


Till 


148 


2ns 


I'.i 


l-i 


7 


.2112 


HI 


22 


Browne, New rork 


127 


586 


II.". 


17.7 


213 


ia 


1 1 


4 


.2:i2 


11 


26 


Sheckard, Brooklyn 


1211 


ISO 


68 


1411 


191 


20 


n 


3 


.292 


15 


2:; 


Howard, Pittsburg. 


llll 


136 


66 


127 


mi 


is 


r> 


2 


.292 


14 


19 


Gesaler, Brooklyn . . 


1 111 


481 


II 


12.". 


1 :.: i 


17 


•I 


:i 


,290 


2 


2i; 


Tenney, Boston .... 


1 is 


549 


84 


l.-.s 


1S2 


18 


:i 


(i 


,2ss 


12 


17 


Beckley, si. Louis. 


134 


r.l 1 


4S 


1 17 





211 


in 


1 


,286 


8 


12 


(Irmly, si. I^mls. . . 


in 


811 


41 


Ml 


135 


211 


7 


4 


.286 


4 


15 


Sabring, Cincinnati. 


56 


217 


:n 


(12 


ss 


111 


5 


2 


.286 


!l 


11 


Abbetlcchlo, Boston. 


I.-.:: 


810 


70 


17H 


228 


25 


12 


3 


2711 


5 


::<i 


UerteSi New York. 


ISO 


561 


SI 


l.-.l 


230 


27 


17 


r. 


.279 


15 


:.2 


Wilis.-. New York 


22 


72 


13 


2u 


22 


2 








,278 


2 


2 


Kelley, Clnd 


S7 


821 


18 


VI 


111 


7 


6 


l 


.277 


11 


s 


Kv.-rs, Cbtcago . . 


99 


:;iii 


44 


04 


112 


11 


2 


l 


.2711 


20 


1:1 


McCarthy, ' inlcago. 


i;: 


171. 


HI 


17 


.".7 


1 


:t 


ii 


.27(1 


5 


8 


Courtney, PhUa. . . . 


165 


mil 


77 


1 85 


199 


II 


7 


2 


.275 


26 


17 


Si-hullc. Ohici 


123 


198 


87 


I3S 


■-1 


IT, 


1 1 


1 


.274 


IS 


i.i 


Hugglns, Cincinnati 


1 Hi 


564 


117 


l.-.l 


Isl 


11 


8 


1 


.272 


II 


27 


st.-inr.-i.it, Clnti... 


106 


384 


49 


Ml 


141 


1.1 


9 


1 


.271 


12 


1.'. 


Slagle, Chicago 


I r,r. 


r.cs 


OS 


153 


ISO 


I'.i 


4 





.269 


12 


27 


Down, <in. A Bos. 


184 


'.in 


r.i 


187 


17:. 


12 


8 


2 


.260 


11 


2.'. 


Bon-errnan. N. Y". . 


80 


2117 


::7 


S.I 


99 


8 


1 


2 


.269 


7 


6 



INDIVIDUAL BATTING-(Continued). 



Dunlin, 
Dobbe, 
Lewie, 
Batch, 
Malaj . 



Bhannon, si. Louis 

1 ituxunel, Brooklyn . 

Kwlng, Cincinnati.. 

Maloney, Chicago. . 

Braoafleld. PhUa.. . 

Strang. New York,. 

Delahanty, Bogton. 

Leach, Pittsburg. - 

Clarke. J., St. Louis 

Ritchey. Pittsburg. 

Warner, St. Louis. 

Ilinehiniin, Cfnti. , . 

Kahoe, Philadelphia 
Philadelphia 
Brooklyn . . . 
Brooklyn.. 
Brooklyn. . - 
Brooklyn. . . 

Brldwell, Cincinnati 

Ooota, Philadelphia 

De Qroff. si. Louis 

Corcoran, Ointi, . . 

Gleason, I'bila 

Cannell, Boston .... 

Tinker, Chicago, . . 

Brain, SI.L.& Pitts. 

Gilbert, New tort 

Devlin, New York. 

Mclntyre, Brooklyn 

Arndt. St. Louis. . 

Dahlen. New York. 

Odwell, Cincinnati. 

Dunleavy, St. Louis 

Koelskoetter, si. i.. 

Moran, Boston .... 

siiav, st. Louis. - - 

Mall, NY. & Itklvn 

Street. Bos, A Cm. 

Hfofman, Chicago. . 

Mathewson, N. Y.. 

Hillehrandt, Pitts. . 

McOinnlty, N. Y.. 

i lasey, Chicago 

Phelps, ('iminiiiii i . 

Thlelman. st. Louis 

i llancj . Pittsburg. - 

Leahy, st. Louis. . 

Schlei, Cincinnati. 

Burke, St. Louis. . 

RTolverton, Boston . 

Praser, Boston . . - 

Pelts. Pittsburg- ■ • 

Bitter, Brooklyn. - . 

KUng, Chicago. . . . 

Ncedham, Boston. . 

McBrlde, Pts.ftS.L. 

i iwens, Brooklyn, . . 

Rayni'-r. Boston. . 

Corridon, Phi 

VPtefmer, Chicago. . 

CarlSCb, Pittsburg. 



<;. 


All 


It 


II. 


Til 


211. 


:•.!*.. 


11: 


re. 


SH.SH. 


140 


544 


7:1 


1 111 


ids 


Ill 


:: 


11 


.2ns 


21 


27 


80 


109 


in 


211 


III 


8 


4 


11 


.21111 


:i 


li 


42 


122 


13 


:;2 


:;r, 


1 


1 


11 


.2112 


5 


1 


145 


558 


78 


145 


11111 


17 


1 1 


•> 


21:11 


15 


50 


161 


5SI 1 


55 


1511 


2i ill 


2:: 





' :; 


.250 


is 


27 


98 


2! It 


51 


7H 


|:i2 





1 


:t 


.250 


12 


25 


121 


4111 


60 


1 111 


111! 


II 


s 


5 


.258 


7 


12 


181 


4111. 


71 


128 


172 


III 


11 


2 


.257 


17 


17 


46 


1B7 


111 


l.-l 


69 


:: 


J 


;; 


.257 


2 


,8 


163 


683 


54 


136 


177 


20 








.255 


9 


12 


41 


187 


9 


18 


II 


2 


2 


1 


.255 


2 


2 


17 


51 


10 


13 


111 


1 


T 


I' 


.255 


1 


4 


16 


:,i 





111 


15 


•1 


II 





.255 


1 


1 


i:sr> 


102 


5:1 


125 


177 


27 


1 1 


1 


.251 





17 


12:; 


111" 


59 


117 


152 


21 


4 


■> 


.254 


14 


15 


1 IS 


133 


.'12 


1 Hi 


1:12 





2 


'. 


.254 


II 


in 


i i;. 


668 


64 


148 


200 


2'i 


11 


5 


.252 





21 


101 


849 


33 


ss 


H 12 


7 


2 


1 


252 


1 1 


i:: 


71 


26 1 


17 


64 


no 


:i 


1 





.252 


15 


s 


Ins 


381 ' 


45 


115 


lis 


11! 


5 





'•25i~ 


Hi 


12 


ir> 


5(1 


:: 


14 


IS 


2 


1 





.250 


1 


1 


ir.i 


60S 


70 


I5i> 


loo 


21 


1 1 


2 


.248 


is 


28 


1 66 


IV is 


96 


1 61 1 


1S4 


17 


7 


1 


.247 


45 


HI 


154 


867 


52 


1 Hi 


102 


1 1 


4 


11 


.247 


10 


17 


149 


5-17 


711 


136 


175 


IS 


8 


2, 


.247 


29 


31 


12:i 


186 


42 


115 


170 


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10 


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s 


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lift 


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88 


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s 


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66 

INDIVIDUAL BATTING-(Coritinued). 



Jones, Brooklyn. 

-■ St. 1.. A p a 
Teller, Chicago 
O'Neill, CW< 
Flaherty, Plti t>uri 
Blankenshlp, Clntl 

Ahl i-hilii 

Chech, Cincinnati 
Bergen, Brooklyn 
Taylor. J., si. L. 
Mitchell, Brooklyn 
Babb, Brooklyn ' 
Lauterborn, 
Krueger, Phila 
gharpe, B - 
Clarke, \V.. \ y ' 

1 Igren, Chicago" 

Gibson, Pittsburg 

. Boston 

Bra iklyn 
Seanlan, Brooklyn ' 
Harper, Cincinnati. 
ucFarland, Si i 
Wilhelm, Bi 

gttenger, p 
Willis. Boston 

Strlcklett. Bi kivi, 

Overall, Cli 

New y rk 

Wicker, Chicago. 
"Jjkfr. Cincinnati 
Lynch. Pittsburg 
Robltalllc, Pitta 
Taylor. I... N v" 
Spark,, ,.,,,,, 

Reulbach, Chicago 
*onng, Boston 

l-'-v.-r. Plti 

St. LonU 
Phillip, 

St. I.. 



<•■ Alt. 



30 




28 


7.", 


is 


in 


IS 


172 


j'.i 


7.; 


1.-, 


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39 


128 


:m 


80 


76 


247 


89 


121 


25 


79 


71 


23S 


:.T 


200 


:; l 


11 1 


16 


170 


L'7 


50 


23 


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II 




2s 


108 


29 


81 


:;:: 


86 


26 


80 


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1 22 


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181 


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117 


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1 ii 

n ii 

n ii 

:i ii 

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.200 
.200 

200 

.Ills 
IH7 

.198 

.r.K) 

.190 

.Urn 
.1S7 
. 1 s.-, 
|s| 
ls-J 
1SII 

1 -II 
.178 
. 1 76 

H17 
! 117 

111.-. 
.ll>l 
ir,7 

I. Ml 
I. VI 
1 is 

1 1.-, 
I II 
I III 

188 
.130 

Us 
127 
109 
,108 
108 
lii2 
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092 



sn.su 



i 
o 
i 

6 

1 
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ii 

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Club. 

ChlcagQ 

burg ..' 
New 1 

Philadelphia 

Si I.. 

i ... 
Bro.,Ulyi, ... 



TEAM FTELDTNG. 



i.v, 
168 

1 :.:. 



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1103 

1 1 H7 
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21 

21 

18 

17 

a 

2) 



INDIVIDUAL FIELDING 

I i U I B \si:mi:\ 

Kajdc niwl < Gamea, P.O. A. 

McOann, New V>rk '. 186 1360 86 

Chance, Chicaa 1 1 ~. 1160 7." 

Branafleld, Pblladelpbia 181 1398 92 

Clancy, Plttsbatj 52 861 27 

Rum. Chicago-Cincinnati ... 161 117:: 7!> 

Tei v. Boston 148 1MB 182 

St. Louis 184 I HI' 88 

1. I'liisl.nrt' 90 812 4S 

lllllclir.-imll. Plttaburg 18 17" 8 

Babb, Brooklyn :(l 814 18 

• iesaler, Hi klvii 1"7 898 77 

Clarke, New fork 18 i"': i 

Bower-man, New Y..rk 17 112 lo 

Ctnclnnatl-Bna .... 16 111 •■> 

Blankcnablp, c Inclnnatl )"• 189 I 

st. Loala 80 180 17 

BBCOND HVSKMI'.N 

I. Iir.,..klvr, 811 ''.'J '■»' 

Bitcbey, Plttaburg 158 27'.' 17s 

Hotmail, Chicago 69 188 its 

Bhay, st Lonll 89 82 120 

Arndt, st. i.,,i,|h :>'• 17:: J.".i 

. Boaton : 14 

Mh-aaon, Pblladelpbia 

Ollbert. Ne« v.ii 1 1.". 246 

Hugglna. Cincinnati I 19 

99 240 290 

Malay, Brooklyn 16 188 216 
Owena, 13 

[Jiiiterlmrii, Boaton 2:1 Id 77 

New fork IT 

I.; 28 W 

TlllltH i:\SK\IK\ 

Boelakoetter, st LooU -"■• '■■■' I" 

142 

7'.l 

bo in 

122 

V.'" 1 "' s ' I t< Plltabura M 90 186 

gurko, st I... i, i, 

Cparti,, . | L ., ; , 

162 I'U'i 

Jfenrlde, hi, ,. . . 17 is 28 

Batch, i. 246 

50 

SHORTSTOPS 

151 84 
I" 
rinker i 

r.i- 

ladelpbla 

"•Ob. Brooklyn .... ,. 7 1 I III 



i:. 


T.C 


IT. 


18 


1 1 19 


.'.nil 


18 






28 


1518 




10 


688 




28 


1.-.MI 


,982 


82 


1740 


.982 


28 




.:isj 


•-'■-■ 


982 


.978 


1 


is. 


97H 


8 


:•.::.-, 


.'.I?'; 


M) 


1106 






113 


,973 




ir,7 






166 


.'."■,'-• 


9 


1 19 




■ 








168 




81 


788 


961 


in 


831 




in 


•JI2 




22 


149 




34 


671 






868 


'■IT 


::i 


846 


:>I7 


81 








:.7.-. 


.937 


26 






18 


252 




11 


184 


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17 


•jni 




:i 






:: 


72 


•172 






949 


- 


1 12 


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1 1 


217 






12a 






188 




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296 




84 


146 


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68 



Individual fielding- (Continued). 

t , outfielders. 

Name and Ctab. ,•„,„., ,..,,, L ,, 

Abbatlcchlo. Boston ,.-,-. gm .... 

Stay, st. Louh .... *iS -;:; ••', S 

panley. Pittsburg .. 2 " " -;' 

Uawta, Pittsburg -7 .£? ,',' 

Clymer. Pittsburg '' •'•- l J 2 

McCarthy, Cblcafo S ' * 

* pwiad^phia .:::::; iS .,-' i 

Shannon. St. I is ,. " -' ' 

. cue** " \;:. a* ,• 5 

ci.rk,-. Pittsburg H» IS \i * 

gmoot, 8t Louis .. ::' "o 2 ! 

Howard, Pittsburg ':£ - -' 'J * 

cine :,,, ■•••■ g ,::-J « 

Beaun t. Plttsbum .- ' 

Titus, PhUadelDh« JS S9 6 - 7 1;! 

Delabanty, BBS .; 2M 24 IJ 

Dunleavy, st i „„ it J-' 188 16 B 

New Y rk I S ,TT -'• 

cincinnVH .::: l s -:::: >s » 

Maloney, rtiir ac „ . "• 23 f 1 

Seymo'ir Cincinnati " - r " 

Clarke. J.. 81 " ,' J '■' :: < 7 » « 

Han, Hew York tun' '" ~' ; ,s ' 

Cannell, Boston r : i S*S " " 

Donlln, New York Hi ;n: ' " 2ri 

Dolan. CItKlmo.ii i, ". '•'" 25«i ]7 |g 

b"j'»-hi. .v.'" „; •;■ i» i« u i! 

Malay, Brooklyn 2S ^ 2 2 

Browne, New York .2 4,> * 

Uroley, Brooklyn .:,' }« » " 

. New York '*' 177 2l "' 

T- St Lorn. ::s «I 4 B 

Sharpe. Boston „' " « « J 

Sebrfog, Cincinnati 11 55 " T 

Bar,i„ y . gSSS ?.:::;:.::::: U I ? 

&*.. <•.,...„,,„*,„ rnv'.Kics. 

Walker Cincinnati . » « 

gobitalile. Pittsburg ?? ■ " 

Wetter, cb| cil _ " , .-( gg 

ii '■> 4 24 

I I.o„| R US 

Mathewson, New ?o»a !' "' 

Thlelman. SI I „n« S >•'■ IM 

Wiltse. New York' ■ 

'■«"■<. St. Umli .- J Ti 

Brtggs, - ii ~- z 

ffiw, Pittsburg -" >1 

WlUIs, Boston . •• M 

McFarland .! tU 7 

'' 1- 7S 4 



T.C. 


P.C. 


02!) 


9111 




.917 


880 


.904 


228 




n 


i 000 


171 


.988 


i ii; 


888 


7:; 


888 


m 




811 




am 


.981 


(88 


.97« 


;:i;i 


.975 


H 


.974 


i n 


.974 


L'lS 


.:i72 


800 


.907 


21^ 


.881 


Stt 






,902 


J'. II 


.962 


2IU 


,902 


LMII 




250 


,900 


2.'. 


.960 


183 


.954 




.!»47 


U 


.'.112 


IU 




271 


.938 




.no 


ess 




21s 


.981 


27 


.998 




.925 


201 


.915 


217 


.:ii2 


M 


.'.in 






-,:. 


.'.ml 


78 


.885 


48 


. n i 


64 


1 ,000 


M 


1 ,000 






2s 


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l.'.l 




|| 




IM 


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4U 


.969 


7^' 


!..'.•• 


188 




n 


.9541 



69 



INDIVIDUAL FIELDING-PITCHERS- 

Njuiic rod i Gkidm, P.O. a. 

Dnggleby, Philadelphia 8 77 

Reufbach, Chicago ■" I II 71 

Brown, M.. Chicago SO I 1 * 88 

Londgren, Chlcag 23 11 51 

Plttaburg :;i 9 IS 

Wicker, Chlcagi ^- 88 

Willi, I: 84 tc, 77 

Plttenger, Philadelphia M --• 

Brown. C, si. Lonla 38 l- 

MeOlnnlty, N.-m v,.rk 48 28 M 

Ajnei. New Y..rk .'M l-' HO 

-. CIlK'Innati -I'l 7" 

Phlllippe, I i 4 71 

Taylor, I... Nan York 33 18 

Baaon. lit klvn '-'7 I 

Chech, Cincinnati .'HI 11 71 

Cincinnati 86 19 

n ::n .in ^" 

in, Brooklyn 8 87 

Btrlcklett, Brooklyn 18 113 

Welmer. Chicago 83 is SB 

Corrldon. Philadelphia 88 18 7L- 

Leerer, Plttabarg 7 70 

J «. Bi klyn . 89 

rty, Plttaburg 27 8 7" 

Melntyre, Bi klyn m 1" 7.'i 

PhlH lelphla 28 

"v.-ntii. Cincinnati 4^ n> 



(Continued). 




B. 


T.C. 


r.r. 


4 






4 


89 




4 


S.S 




:: 


65 




:: 






o 


41 


.860 


8 


98 


.948 


8 


96 


.'.Us 


I 


77 


.'.US 


■ 


1341 


.nil 


5 


v.; 


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5 


M 


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T. 


ga 


.'IIU 


8 


m 


938 


8 


7s 


•i >i 


6 


91 


.984 


4 






'.i 


1 28 


.928 


.". 






1" 


186 


928 


7 


80 




8 


88 




a 


88 




i 




Ml7 


!l 


86 


89 1 


In 


88 




r, 


i- 






105 





. SI. I 

Num.' gnd Club. 

Uorao, Boaton 7., 

man. Sew Y..rk .... 7L' 

Kahoi-. Philadelphia 18 

» (Mil, Chicago 

. s7 
K/lng. Chicago . . iihi 

'■Ibaiin. pin. !,,,.. n 

'•••'"■'< 111 

I'bllade 107 

,....87 

whlel, Cincinnati 

ii 

71 

llerg, , 7 „ 

oklyn ... -I 

. 77 

... II 

I 29 



ii BUB. 












P 


A 






r.r. 


P.B. 






7 






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88 


n 




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L'n 


i 






ii 


276 


■ 


9 




.'.17 1 


8 




13 


i 


184 








II I 


in 












L'l 


698 






290 




B 






s 


81 






H 




1 






L'l 


881 




13 




i".-. 


HI 




N 


VI 






28 






17 






In 






8 




64 








B 


288 




17 






B 




IL'7 


84 






IS 




II 








l 






38 










184 








1 1 












11 


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: 






4 



70 

RECORD OF NATIONAL LEAGUK PITCHING. 



2; c. « 



~ J 



Mums and Player. 



&.; S 



>• — a 4> 



Lcever. rittsiiirir 31 

Mathewson, New Y...-k 
Anirs. N. u Sfork ... 
Lundgren, Chicago . 

Wilis... Now York %i 

Hlllebrandt, Plttsburs 

Wicker, Chicago .... " ' Ji 

Lynch. Plttaburg . 

Swing, Cincinnati ...'.'.',.'" ' 40 

I- Taylor, New V irk 

ilabn. Cincinnati . . 1? 

Plttenger, Philadelphia 4« 

Bobltatlle, Pittsburg . 17 

I'hilllppc, Pittsburg 

Wei r. Chicago 

M. Brown, Chicago .. ao 

McOlnnlty, New Pork 

Beulbach, Chlcag " 

Walker, Cincinnati .. '" ' S 
Sparks, Philadelphia .. " u 

Scanlan, Brooklyn 

Dngjtleby, Philadelphia " ss 

Chech, Cincl m 

Case, Pittsburg .. ", 

Flaherty, Pittsburg . " ~ 7 

'•"" *>"»" ■ 

Proffer, Chicago ....'.'.' S 

Kellum, st. Louis '" ,', 

Coung, Boston ' ti 

Thlelman, St. Louis . 

Corrldon, Philadelphia . 

Overall, Cincinnati ' <■> 

Suttnoff. Philadelphia . 

c. Brown, &t. Louts ....,.' 

J. Taylor, St. I is "" « 

Harper. Cincinnati ' 4. 

Fruser. Boston ' 7,,. 

J s. Brooklyn "" 

Btrlcklett. Brooklyn ' n 

McParland, si. Louis 

Mitchell, Brooklyn . ,'• 

Willis. Boston '. ... ., 

Bgan, si. 1.,, .,is ... '" ,, 

Helntrre, Brooklyn <„ 

Bason, Brooklyn 'I- 

Doescher, Hrooklvn . ' 19 

Wllhclui. Boston ... if 

Eiiiott, New Y.,rk ....!;;:;::;; , n 



■ s s 

c - - 

y. ~ 
230 862 
339 1229 



197 
HI 
178 



MO 

72! 
1 . 
S2S 

7.1 



■:,vi nr.:i 
J13 810 

MS WO 
DM 12<i« 
2M 1033 



l*s 
l'.'l 
10) 
101 

71 



212 :.n 

212 751 

171 691 

38 102 



IBS 
261 

22(1 

I.! J 

I : 
ISO 

1*1 

85 

211 
ISO 

iii 
ut 

208 

171 
217 
220 

no 
no 

80! 
UTJ 

in 

70 

26", 


too 

172 

1 VI 

i:.7 
107 

110 

to 

2*7 
41 



111 

130 
81 
17 
M 
N 
M 
U 

140 

|0t 

III! 

K 

n 

1 it 
1 7 1 

141 

140 

72 
171 

H 

UH 

12s 

in 

20 



11 - 

> & 

< 

7.0 

7.9 

7.7 

7.3 

6.2 

«.l 

8.1 

• 12 

7.x 

6.7 

5.9 

7.2 

7.1 

7.2 

7..; 
8.3 
7." 

B.6 
6.3 
7.6 

7.6 
7.6 
6.9 

7.11 
7.11 

7..; 

8.4 
6.7 
1.1 
1.1 

7..; 
1.1 

7 .1 
6.0 

7.8 
8.4 
I ■ 

6.0 
7.2 
1.1 
8.0 
1.1 
7.4 
7.7 
7.7 
5.9 
7.1 
3.8 






29 6. 
23 5 

2;. 
21 

21 

27 
27 

38 

31 

2>: 

30 6. 



27 



28 7. 
27 



< 

2.8 

2.. I 

3.3 

2.5 

2.2 

1.0 

2.1 
3.1 
3.1 
2.7 
3.4 
9.4 
I 
2.5 

3.0 

t.a 

2.1 
3.0 
2..-. 
3.6 
3.1 
3.6 
1.0 
3.2 

3.7 
2.9 
2.1 
2.7 
3.4 
4.3 
3.1 
3.5 
3.5 
3.5 
4.2 
4.5 
1 

4.2 
4.2 
4.7 
6.0 
4.2 
4.. I 
4.7 
4.7 
2.8 
4.9 
2.0 



71 



RECORD OF NATIONAL LEAGUE PITCHING. 



3 ft » 



Kano and player. c ? £ 

S 5 IS 

* a ■ a -a a 

e» d ii a 2 a 

•Tm > m "- 

< < £* 

I.icvcr, Plttaburg 1.6 2.6 12 

nfathewaon. Mew fork ,.j 4.8 1 

Amis. Now Vi.rk 3.1 5.8 3 

Lundgren, Chicago 2.3 3.0 9 

WllUe. Ken JTork i.» 3.7 4 

HUIebrandt, Plttaburg l.t 3.7 2 

Wicker, Chicago 2.1 I.I l 

Lynch, PltUburg 3. J 3.2 r. 

Ewing, Cincinnati :." i.i n 

1.. Taylor, New York 1.1 

llnhn, Cincinnati o.c I. J 2 

Pittenger, Philadelphia 1.6 tl 

Robitaille, PltUbnrg l.c 1.9 > 

Philllppc, Plttaburg 1.1 2.5 10 

Welmer, Chicago 8.1 1.2 12 

M. Brown, Cblcag 1.6 1.0 

McGlnnlty, New Y..rk 1.6 2.7 H 

Reulbach, Chicago 1.1 1.1 

Walker, Cincinnati I.I 1.1 I 

Sparka, l'hlhHlrlphhi 1 ,1 

Scanlan, Brooklyn 3 2 I.i 8 

Dug«lcby, Philadelphia 

Chech, Cincinnati 1.0 2.0 n 

Caae, Plttaburg 1.1 1.1 U 

Flaherty, Plttaburg I.I 1.6 6 

Philadelphia 1.1 2.6 4 

HrlEKH. Chicago 2.6 3.4 6 

Pfeffer, Chicago 2.4 3.7 4 

Kellum, si. Loula 0.9 1.7 1 

Boaton 1.7 3.6 8 

Thlel st. Loula 1.1 2.7 12 

Corrldon, Phllmli'lphln 

Orerall, Cincinnati I.i 1.1 11 

ButthotY, Philadelphia 2.7 2.0 4 

C. Brown, Bt Uroll 2.7 

.!. Taylor, si. Loola 1.1 2.8 11 

Harper, Cincinnati 2.7 2.7 8 

Praaer, Boaton 3« 3.3 is 

■i >a, Brooklyn 1 .'< 

11, Brooklyn 2.2 2.3 14 

McFarland, St. Loula 2.1 2.7 6 

Mitchell, Brooklyn 3.:' 

Willis. Boaton 2.6 3.6 13 

Bgan, Bt. 1-i.iiIk 1.7 l.l » 

Mclntyre. Brooklyn 2.r, 3.4 20 

Brooklyn 2.7 2.4 5 

1 acber, Brooklyn ■ r. 2.7 3 

Wllbelm, Boaton 2.2 2.2 I 

Elliott, New Y.irk 1.2 2.0 1 



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72 

WORLD'S 
CHAMPIONSHIP 



KtTLKfi ,\ni. RjESUl 




'" 'w ",',"'"! i Ball Cba lonshipof 

'"S^™ i"" 1 : I between National and American League 
um ° be National Commission Febroarj Klaus 
'"" : the National and American l.,iiirues, 
ary 16, lauo, und amended September 22, IMS. 
Agreement to Play - 

ti,^",'l!,"!,'... 1 ; ,.'•"'"- '"'""""i-^i'H.iiiK dob of the National League and 

, ■""•""" "':>'"!.' cli r the American League shall meet annu- 

of the woridT I*™" f " r I'"' Professional Baas Ball Championship 

The Emblem and Menu 

'Hi,- emblem ,,,- |1]P ppofeaaionai Base Ball Championship 



of the World shall i 



„ pennant, t>, i»- presented to the victorious 



,„,!'',,"' a " a P nr »Prtate meme In the form of a butt 

to oe presented to each player of the rlctorloui club. Both shall be 

", ■ ,"' ..^V"""-"' 1 Commission. The coal ol pennant und 

tons thai] be pa .. sl „„. 

Ti.hr. Rowed Dtader Supervision of National C ssilM 

mdrti™ ,i' ! " L: ";"' s ? ha . n '"■ J'"' 1 node' ""' superrtolon, control 

'"'" •'""" ' National Commission. 

Whin to he Played 

sef!aan of '' '"' ," v "" t A] ' : ' n h,l <" i' 1 '"" a( the end of tl bampionabip 

each year. Seven > conatil a c leti 

W fiBto Authorised by tile National Agreement 

rnii's'' -.1'',,- Vn i"' : ','"" s , s,,:i " '"' ' '"•" hI according to the playing 

1 "' s ■'" p b» the National Agreem 

Whi re to be Played 

th^ATon'i '-'.'V • v "' ,, " i ' 1 ComnUssaon shall nromolga lole for 

''""■' •'_"'" imtoMaff CTu&s and Notiee to Players 

I,,.' ;,'.,'„,'..,.„ ,l;i'i';'"'r e £ tlt, , c 1 d '" '"""■"' for the World's II r* shall 

T h e H leagues and 

all of ii, d„ .,•« ,• " ' '• ''«' "quired to 

,,.. ,,,'',, contesting teams thai they will be held 

!STJBS3f fU " w '"'" 

to Terminate— Winning Club 
authorised sdL?ul,£ l "nSfi 11 '" !a5 " p,,oh ''"J - KSCOMtog to the 

■i Mem or »■ n ;,, f '" I, 1 ." 1 ', ," l ""l">-' shall be entitled to By the 



73 



Right to Terminate the Series 

Sec. 9. The National Commission shall reserve to ii *<'if the ripht 
to terminate the series a1 any time thai 11 deems the Interesl of base 
hull demands It, and to declare one of the contesting clubs the winner 
of the Championship regardless of previous performances. 

Guarantee of Contesting Clubs 

Sec i". Bach of the clubs participating In the event shall guar* 
anteo to the National Commission in such manner as the latter may 
prescribe thai they will faithfully carry oul all of the provisions 
of these rules and regulations, and men others as the Commission 
may hereafter make to govern the games, and thai they will not 
exercise an arbitrary rlgbl or privilege of abandoning the series until 
h it as been completed or the Championship determined. 

The Umpires 

Si- ■ ii. There shall be two ompirea, who shall be Invested with 
th" authority and discretion thai the playing rules confer, and they 
shall observe the same general Instructions with reference to main" 
talning order and discipline npon the ball field during these coi 
that govern them in the performance of their duties in all other 
games In their respective leagues. 

Umpires — How Selected 

Sim-. 12. The President of the National League and the Presi- 
dent of the American League shall each selecl one empire from thfir 
respective leagues, and the umpire so chosen shall be assigned to duty 
and i»- subject to the orders <>( the Chairman ol the National Com- 
miaalon. 

Compensation of Umpires 

Sec. 18. The compensation of tin- umpires shall be fixed by the 
National commission. 

Expenses— How Adjusted 

Sec. ii. The expenses "f tho National Commission pertaining t<> 
these if the umpires, and other miscellaneous 

and contingent expenses In connection therewith shall be paid oat 
of the i" 1 1 nds to I-' received bj the Commission from these ■-■ 
should these funds prove Insufflclenl for this purpose, the ba 
shall Ih* paid oo1 of the regular fundi of the Commission; and should 
there be a surplus in these funds. ii shall be credited each year 
regular funds of the Commission. All other expenses of both 
clubs, sii'li aa hotel bills and traveling expenses, halls, advertising, 
policing of grounds, ttckel sellers and takers. Incidentals, etc 
i"- paid by the clan Incurring the same. Should any difference 

at any time as to the Ul U be sut. mil toil to 

the r.'umii ition, and its final shall i"' conclusive. 

Constitutional Rights of the Clubs 

Sec. i,"i. Bach contesting club shall preserve iis constltui 
rights duri im' games played upon lis own grounds with reference to 
aducl "i us business affairs in connection therewith, bul the 
visiting club shall also Inherent rights and whatever 

ntatlon and facilities ii may require to properly protecl the 
Interests of the club and its players: Provided, how pver, thnl the 
taptaln of the home team should no) be accorded the privilege to de- 
tannine whether the grounds are lit. This authority will be delegated 
to tin- umpires. If they fail to agree, the umpire whose turn it la 
to officiate behind the plate will decide as to tin- condition of the 
ground. 

Rates of Admission 

s. ■•-. i«; The rates of admission and the conditions governing the 



in 









nunc slmll i„ 
Commission. 



Ixed iiy nMf | 



74 

be under ■ I ■ • ■ 



Miiirol ..f lit.* Nnll.timl 



Division of Receipts 

l * C8| Pbi from, the came* abell be .livl.l.-.l ss fol- 

shall be said to I'h.-'V... ■"'''; " f ""' '•'""•" receipts from si! csmes 

"I- Sixty (Ml N ' ,l '" lal Comn 
games simii r.>n„ „ , ,' , ,''''"'-, " f the balance from tbe iir*t r..nr 
divided serentj-flTe (?-," "'" P»»e« "' the two leams, to be 

»t to toe loser ', f ."/ ''''"' '" ""' winner "i"i twontjr-hVre (25) 

Third. After that ,, "" 
;""' ">•• sl !•••!• .•.•„!. deductions for the Commission, 

■wt four games, the i,-.i wh J"'' r " r ""' U» ' from the 

"•"■"I* beti d i the tv '!'", "' "'" - "hall be dlTldnd 

Fourth Tli.- em clubt, 

b /,this section shall £ '"' ,' m " 1 l "'" "'- players" l»«'I '"• pjorkled 
shall be distributed to "«?", '" "' Commission, snd the 
1 ommJi '"• brooch the of the 

■erles extends i-i-,„1,'i" .,""", ""■ "chedule r..r a World's CnamptonaUp 

'■' the players «i .„, '"' I' 1 

^ s ,^„^ ' r "" r " r "'" r " «— - '"">"" 

• s,, <'. 18. •|h.- 

\J»;;; : ' MatlTes [,"!'," " '"' »wp»»«ed annua tl ntesl 

"•MM* ' w tbe press and enb omclals of tb. 

T "Z" f ^ re,e ^' tion « Pennant and /?,„„„„ 

""," 11 " h " 1 ' la :......,!,'' ■," ' *> "" National .',„„. 

Presentation, '"' '■• ami Jh „ r .„,.,, 

LHxmiioo I* t. a* ... 



^•mPlnnshlp ,„ ■ ,i„. pi,,-,,,, 

All Clubs tn a "oeMed b] lb. N n.l i 

, ,'; the 



vitis f..r the World's 
nlartnf 
Xstlonsl Vornu 



Comml 






III IKH nr> .. i i . " 









Mrtlcipatlnc 



which ah 



tl,. 



i nil 



thel 



In 






■ t pr| 









■Ij" nxr.*,-.] 






... 'i.iiiU'i l.ri.,.., r 



Players to be 



hi eiaba 
paid st 






M. 



NottAti 






• > irr 






After 



tttrs ...nd 






i-r.„; , 

bis elob ' "' M » r ' I' -II. .... n 



' 



. 




HIGHEST AWARDS 

»0K SPALSmC ATHLETIC goods 



GRAND PRIZI 

ST LOUIS 
KM 




GRAND PRIX 

PARIS 
1900 








*«h the regulations ol 

A.vm 



Spalding 
Official 
League 
Ball 



USED e x - 
clusively 
by the 
National 
League, Minor 
Leagues, and 
by all lnl<i 
collegiate and 
oilier Associ- 
ations for over 
a quarter of a 
crnlury. Each 
ball wrapped in 
tin foil and pul 
i n a separate 
box, and sealed 
i n accordance 
and American 
Inn used undct 



N iiional League 
elation. W« I t a full |H 

onlin.iry conditions. 

No. 1. Official League Ball. Each, $1.25 

^ Send f,,r IHnMtinl Complete Catalogue of all AthMic Sport*. 



f?=S A. C. SPALDING A BROS 

grrYork Chicasro 

Buff.1 , ' Kan* 

Mor... 1 Phill >'l<-lphia Waahinic 
-^I?l. <:«nmla l,.mlnn, England 



(U. 



San Franeiaco 

Kl.rnu I 

. .nnati 
llamburir. Onimnv 







HIGHEST AWARDS 



>OK SPALDING ATHLETIC GOODS 

CRAND PRIX 

PAHS 
1900 



CRAND PRIZE 

ST. LOUIS 

1904 




S G 




SPALDING GOLD MEDAL BATS 



Tha 
popu- 
larity 

■tttkMd 
by the 
Bpftldfttg 
GoMIUdil 

Bats ilmply 

illustrates the 

making some 
thing non Ihu. 
mere manufartu 
ring skill ts neces- 
sary The man who 
makes a base ball bat 
should know just what 
is required, not merely 
in a general way. but it. 
a special sent*, and when 
he ia shaping the timber 
there must be within him 
the knowledge and skill re- 
quired to shape it so that the 
balance will be perfect and 
the bulk left in the correct place. 
Thai la something that coma* only 
through experience, and we claim 
that a bat-making career extending 
over twenty-nine years, with 
equalled facilities M 
should be considered when ) 
dteide whose bate they wi 




f., .,■>'! psa> 

feet in bel- 

n c e , finish 

quality of 

timber, all of 

them being made 

of moat carefully 

wlmribwHrMfi 

■ ah. saaaoned in 
sheds for threw 
years (not kilndried>. 
md In placing oar 
trade-mark and mark of 
superiority upon thctn we 
do so with perfect eonfl- 
that they 
the reputation of A-G.9paJd- 
Ing k Bra*, for furnishing 
goods of satisfactory quality. 
Each bat ia passed under the 
critical eya of one of the beat 
known old-time base ball playara 
and carefully tested aa to balance. 
•hap*, quality of 
finish, etc.. before being parsed 
Be sura that the guarantee tic b 
attached to each bat whan you pure has*. 



OOYB' 

n° tut l^!^?* Modal Plain lta,. C oM™Fin*h. . . . &eh, 11.00 
No.GMB. Spaldiag Boy.' Gold Med»l PUin Ikt, GoWm Finirt. Boy^Si«. " .80 
Send for Spaldinir'a Complete Catalog.- „t all Athletic Sport*. 

^P^J) A. C. SPALDINC 4. BROS. ft 

NawYo* Chicair., S... I,.,,; ) ,. San Francisco 

KanaaaCity ' 






Buffalo Philadelphia Wa 

Montreal, l-anada U . »„d |[ . 






mm 




HIGHEST AWARDS 

ron spaumnc athlitk cooas 



GRAND PRIZE 

ST. LOUIS 
1904 




GRAND PRIX 

PARIS 
1900 



TH E 




SPALDING MUSHROOM BAT 

I 

C * =a Patented Aug. 1, 1905 g 




N this bat a principle hu been utilized which makr* it many 
times mem affective than th* ordinary ■tyl* ui.dar certain 
condition*, and *■ an all-around bat we have received many 
kiUr* from prominent professional player* testifying to 
their appreciation of the good point* of it* construction 
They »ay "Both balance and model are perfect. "and we 
know both these points of construction have been brought a* near to per- 
fection u it m poaaibla for human ingenuity to go. 

The knob arrangement at the end of the bat enable* u* to get • mora 
eran distribution of weight over th* whole length than » possible under the 
old construction, and for certain kinds of play the hat ia practically invalu- 
able. It is this feature which appeal* to the up-to-date player, and even 
with nothing else to renanmend it, the bat would b* an acquisition for any 
player animus to make a good record. Only the Very beat quality of air- 
dncd Umber ha* been u**d and wary ana ia carefully tasted by an expert 
before leaving our factory 

W* recommend it heartily to our e l a s t omer*, feeling certain that ih«*y 
will find tn the combination of good qualitiea which it puearasee something 
which they have Bought for in vain elsew h ere — a perfect bat. 
No. M. Masbrooca Plata fat. Social Finish. Each. >l 00 

No MT. MtNarooasTavad •*!. Tsaed Handle. . . "1.00 




hike** t *4 BioaVi ol .v. lm i* *ctMh 

J*X» 9, CaLLaJUsV 



• a* 'iptfWMt M hu* *•*! S ^S IW I 




■ 
..I b*U. I~l >»i Ih 



*« njuiea 






VeavtinaV. 

m*« a 



Band Eoc ffimltting'ff Oismpivti CahitogTM of all Athlt 



^=J 



=3 C= 



A. C. SPALDING 4. BROS. 



(b=* 



N«« York Chicajrn San I 

Boston M KariHaM City New Orleans 

HufTalo I'luhtdciphia Washin»rt<<!i Pttt*Umrs SymenM Ch 
Montreal. (Canada London, England llarntuir}?, C«-rmuny 




HIGHEST AWARDS 

FOR SPALWNC ATHHT1C COODS 



GRAND PRIZE f\ 
ST. LOUIS 




CRAND PRIX 

PAHS 
1900 




=3(7= 



Spalding 
"Three ai\d Out" Catchers' Mitt 

Patented 



^ 




W f 



MOLDED FACE 

E believe this mitt, with its patented " Molded " face will 
on, not only t.. those old-time players who 
arrangemei I to i>"t up with 

twenty anil odd years alto, hut all i„„, who 

have witnessed many improvements in the construction of 

Uaterial and we 

fff i' e nlv l...-it!„. r wl,i,h i 

chin? and molding proceo* which en 

to produce a perfect pocket" with in, 
any kind on the face. Padded with best hair felt, metal 
and steel wire lacing, leather strap and i 
. hack. 

=3 No. 9-0. EACH, $8.00 c, 
A. C. SPALDING & BROS. 



Jf 



(U 



New York Cm. St. I>.uis Denver San Francisco 

Minneapolis Baltimore Kansas City New Orleans 

Buffalo Philadelphia Washington Pittsburg Syracuse Cincinnati 

I Montreal. Canada London. England Hamburg, (knuany 



HHH 



Ml 




Professional 

First Basemen's 

Mit,L 

Composed of same 
quality materials and 
workmanship as our 
No. BX First 

men's Mitt. It has 
no heel pad and is 
made up especially fur 
p V n f e s s i (] n a 1 use. 
Strap-and-buckle fas- 
tening at back. 

No. BXS. Each, $4.00 





MADE IN RICHTS 



No. CX 

First Basemen's 

Mitt, 

Fine quality and finish ; 
made i in same I 
X... BX \i 

illy tanned drab 

: back < > t firm 
tanned brown leather, 

extra well padded al 

wrist and thumb; laced 
all around. Strap-and 
buckle fastening a t 

back. 
No. CX. Each, $2.00 
AND LEFTS 



fJ 



A. C. SPALDING &. BROS. 



(U, 



New York Chicago SL Louix Denver San I 

Boston Minneapolis BaltimoT* KJUMU'OHy New I ■■ 
Buffalo Philadelphia Washington Pittsburg Sj ■Hnnat.i 

Montreal. Canada London. England Hamburg, Germany 










HIGHEST AWARDS 

rOK SPAUHNC ATHLXTK GOODS 



CRAND VUZt 
ST. LOUIS 




CRAND PRIX 
r aiis 

1900 




tr 



Spalding 
Uniform No. 

Hioliest Grade Made 

WORKMANSHIP and 

material in this uni- 
form is of the very I 
est quality throughout. 
Used exclusively by all 
league and professional 
clubs for years past i g 
sufficient evidence - 
quality and durability. 

The Spalding Uniform No. 
Complete $15.00 

Net price to clubs ordering 
for Entire Team. Suit, $12.50 



Colors: White, Pearl Grav 

Yale Gray. Light Gray. Black 

>, rw "^, Maro " n ' R °v«l Blue. 

Navy Blue, Brown. Cardinal. 

Conmstinn of: Spalding Shirt 

any style; Spalding Pants 

any style; Spalding Cap, any 

style; Spaldmg Wei, Belt 

leatherhned; Spalding Stock- 
ings, No. 3-0. 



No 3-OS Striped Btoekiasi in 
stock colors furnished 
fcx tra Charge if d< 
Special CoUn-s Extra— with 
single suit, arpalr: 

with order for entire team. 
"»c. per pair. 



University 
Uniform No. 1 

|N workmanship and 
quality of material our 
University Uniform No. 
i is equal to our No. o 
Uniform, but slight!) 
lighter. 

The University Uniform No.l 
Complete, $12.50 

Net price to clubs ordering 
for entire team. Suit, $10.00 



Colon: White, Pearl Gray. 

fata Gray. Light Gray. Black. 

Maroon, Royal Blue. 

Navy Blue, Brown, Cardinal. 

Ctm»i»(i no- n/. University Shirt, 

any style; University Pants. 

any style; University Gap. any 

style: University VWi. 

or all leather; University 

Stockings. No. 1R. 



k 



No extra charge for Uttering .hirt* with name of club nor for 
attachable Bleevee. 



=\ 



No. IKS Striped Stockings 
in stock colors furni: r 
No Extra Charge if d< 

/ rfrn Willi 

single suit, 50 cents per pair; 
with order for entire team. 
25 centu per pair. 



fj 



A. C. 



SPALDINC &. BROS. 

BoTton * SinXolis Ba.tto* San FnuS* 

Buffalo PhiffiphS WaaMn^n Pit.sT a "" , "<F ity Nuw ° rle * n ' 
Montreal. Canada T^'lS^^ *."«»- > C.cinnati 



J 



Al 



^(ifi» 



^SP ALDING'S ATHLETIC LffiRARY ^ 

No. 13— How to Play Hand Ball. 

ids cbsmpl Michael Egan, of Jersey 

City. This book baa been rewritten and brought ap to 
ilnii- iii .v. iy particular. Every play la tburoughly 

explained by text and diagram. The numei B illns 

tratlona conalal of foil page* made from pbotographa 
of champion ESgan, abowing blm In ull bis charaetef1a> 
He attitudes. Price 10 cents. 

No. 14 — Curling. 

.\ abort history ol mu Bcottlali pastime, with 

Instructions Cor play, rules of tin- game, definitions >>f 
terms and diagrams of different sii.,is. Price 10 cents. 

No. 23 — Canoeing. 

Bowyer Vaox. Paddling, aaiiing, cruising anil 
racing canoes snd tbeir ns.-s; with bints on rig and 

management; tin- cnol f n canoe; siiiiint: canoes; 

regulations; csnoeing and camping. I'ully Muh- 
trated. Price lu cents. 
No. 27 — College Athletics. 

M. 0. Murphy. Use well-known athletic trainer, now 

with Peonaylvsnta, the author <»f this book, has written 

i .! iii,- schoolboy and college man, but ii is 

Inrnluablc athlete who wishes to excel In an] 

bn h "f athletic sport The subject comprises the 

following articles; Training, stsrtlng, sprinting; how to 
trulu for tin- Quarter, hull', mile and longer distances; 
walking, li luh and broad Jumping; hurling; pole vault- 
Ing; throwing the hammer. It is profusely Illustrated 
with pictures "f leading athletes, and has been revised 

on of 1908. Price 10 casta. 
No. 29 — Pulley Weight Exercises. 

Henry B, inderson, Lnstroctor in heavy cjiii- 
, ii. gymnasium, Anderson Normal School, i ban 
University, I nJillKl loll with a chest ma 

with this i k i iin I Mm- perfectly 'lo- 
ci. Pries if '•• 
No. 55 — Official Sporting Rules. 

is rules not found in other publications for 

sports; rules for wrestling, 

nt ry running, ■hufocboard, skating, anowshtie- 

Ing, q U i racing, professional racing, racquets, 

pigeon Hying, 't"H racing, pistol snd booting. 

■ 1.18. 

No. 87— Athletic Primer. 

B, Sullivan, Baeretary-Treasorer of 
1,,'ir Athletic I Hi""; tells how ti 

odurl mi sthletlc meeting, and 

[ilea for the government "f athletic t tings; 

llrectlons f"r building • track 
tractive 
fully Illustrated with picture* of 
Pries 10 on 
No. 102 — Ground Tumbling. 

p. ptrrf Henry Walter Worth, who waa for yean 
director ..f the \rno.ur Institute ■■< Technology, 
reading this I k snd following the ta- 
me u proiitkut tumbler. Prist 








^""sS 



•-ZL-A 



(-^ SPALDING'S ATHLETIC LIBRARY n 

No. 104 — The Grading of Gymnastic Exer- 
cises. 
Iiy <;. M. Martin, Physical Director of the Y. M. C, A. 
of fonngstown, Ohio, li is a book that should l«- in 
the bands of ™»; physical director of the V. M. ('.A., 
school, club, college, etc. The contents comprise: Tba 
phi f toe class in physical training; grading of exer- 
cise! and season schedules—grading of men, grading of 
exercises, season schedules for various cli 
tary and advanced classes, leaders, optional exercise*. 
Nearly 200 pages. Price 10 cents. 

No. 124— How to Become a Gymnast. 

By Boberl BtoU, of the New Tort a. <•.. tba Amerl- 

<•'"' 'iLiniiii. i the dying rings from 1880 to 1882. 

Any boy who frequents ■ ,, can easily follow 

tne Illustrations and instructions in this book ami with 

a little practice I ne proflcienl on tbe horizontal and 

parallel bars, the trapes thi 

No. 128 — How to Row. 

Hy i:. ,i. Glannlnl, of the New Sort A. C, one of 
America smosl inn,. .us amateur oarsmen and cham- 
pions, nils book will Instruct any one who la 
of rowing now to become an expert. It is folly Ulns- 

trate-d. showing bow to hold i ars, the finish of the 

""'",' ;""'. ■'"■"'' ' "ill prove valuable 

to the beginner. Price to cents 

No. 129— Water Polo. 
By Ops Bnndsti ■. Instructor al the New York AC. 

!,i..v.~ ' .r " v,, '- v •'' '• iil ' ""• ' vM ""' "«'« " r ""• 

uv ,.'i.i Tn '"."","• " r ""■ <""'". bo« i" throw the 
ill cenu!' I " US "'""" IS , "" 1 »'"".*• Enable bints. Trice 

No. 138 — Official Croquet Guide. 

St'n'.'kes'';rese, r 'i',', , l'i",' M .r' r "'"• V ','"•'' "MM™ Of in. 

f.i ,,r , , ' 'I ? f *-' r "" 1 " 1 ". Instructions roi 

1,1.,"""," ""• •■'"""■■ » nd " Me»' l''»y 

int; rules. Priee 10 cents. 

No. 140— Wrestling. 

The 11 ', " , "■ p - NeBigsn, of Vrchersl College. 

N ?V 1 ^7 P T hy ?. ical Traini "3 Simplified. 
„;, :;,„.,',■• V; ., V: ' r " ,: "'' ">« well-known 
book where the w. ,'"""" 1 - 1 "; thorough and i 

bod? I v f„l,.ui,ci" ,'" ;i ," 

bowTT p h'rwt^-\»AtSnri,l 

Angers wrists clhnw. U i! "*' exercises f..r Ibe 






n SPALDING'S ATHLETIC LIBRARY 

No. 143 — Indian Clubs and Dumb-Bells. 

'Jam ol the iii"si popular forma of borne of gymnasium 

■ . is u in ten bj America a amateur 

m club swinger, J. II. Dougherty, it i« clearly 

'.-.1. by which any novice I'nii become an expert. 

Prlci )<> centa. 










uw I 



No. 149— The Care of the Body. 

a booh thai all who value health should read and 
follow its instructions. By Prof. I. B. Warnwn. the 
well-known lecturer and authority on physical culture 
The subject i* thoroughly in-ai.il. as a glance at the 
following small portion of the contenta shows: ah all- 
around athlete; muscular Christianity ; eating. dicl 
is; bill "f fare for brain workera; Mil <>( 

fare f..r mnscll ^makers ; what U) cat ami .Irtnk; a Sitt) 

pie diet; an opinion oh brain food; why is (i*h\ re 
quired} drinking water; nutrition bow f <«>«! nourishes 

the body; a day's i I. bow need; ist Ituenta of a 

day's ral inn beefsteak, potatoes, bread, butter, water, 
genua of disease, etc. Price i" centa. 

No. 154 — Field Hockey. 
T'» those in need •>( rigorous and healthful out-oJ 
i his game is recommended blghly, it* 
honltbful attributes are manifold ami the In teres! of 
player an- 1 spectator a ilk.- is kept active throughout 
■ game, The Kame is prominent in 
t in sports ;it Vaaaar, Smith, wolleelej , Brjrn. Mawr 
ami other leading college Price i" cents, 

No. 156— The Athlete's Guide. 

Mow to become an athlete. M contains full Instruc 
tlons for the beginner, telling bow to sprint . hurdle, 
jump and throw weigh te, general bints on training; 
in fact, tbla i»»'k is one of the most complete on the 
subject that lias <■-. , Special chapters eon 

tain vi hi a hie ailvlee to beginners ami Import a tn \ \ 

D. rules ami tielr explanations, while the pictures com- 
prise many scenes --r champions In action. Price 10 eta. 

No. 157— How to Play Tennis. 

picto description of lawn tennis j a lesson tor 
beginners ami directions telling how to make the most 
trokes; styles and skill of the experts; 
the American twist service: bow i<> build and keep -i 
court, Illustrated from photographs of leading players 
in sctlon. P ■ tits. 

No. 158 — Indoor and Outdoor Gymnastic 
Games. 

f the tn'r*t ho..ks of its kind 
ev.-r published. Compiled by Prol \ M Cnesley, the 
well- known V M. ' A. physical director. It Is a 
tHM.k that will prove valuable to Indoor ami outdoor 
gymnasiums, schools, outings ami where 

amused "iii,- games described 
compriac a n«t of |30, divided Into arreTm] groups, 
■ ute. 






a 



SPALDING'S ATHLETIC LIBRARY 



D 



No. 161 — Ten Minutes' Exercise for Busy 
Men. 
By Dr. Lather Halsey Qui! ,,f Physical 

Training In the New ifork pub Anyone who 

is l.i.>kinK for and iplel rse or physical 

education at home would do well to procure a copy <>t 
thin liook. Ton minutes' work ;is directed is exercise 
any. hi.- can follow, n already lias had o la 
ami lias been highly recommended by all who have fol- 
lowed its Instructions. Nearly loo pases of Illustra- 
tions and luu uf text. Price 10 cents. 

No. 162 — Boxing Guide. 

For many yean 1 ks have been Issued on the art 

of boxing, Imr It has remained f..r us to arrange u 
hook that we think Is son- to till all demands, it eon- 
tains over To pages ..f Illustrations showing all the 
latest blows, posed especially for this book under the 
supervision of a well-known Instructor ..f boxing, who 
makes a specialty of teaching and knows bow to Imparl 
his knowledge. They are so arranged thai anyone can 

easily beco proficient. A partial list ..f the i tenta 

Includes: rue correct position; clenching the list: gaug- 
ing distance; the lirst principles of hitting; the ele- 
ment* of defence; feinting; knockout blow 

punch; U>e blow lor the ear; the famous solar plexua 

knockout; the heart blow; famous bl belr orig- 
inators; Fltxslmi t! contribution; the McCoy cork- 
screw; the kidney punch; the liver punch; the science 
of boxing; proper position of bond ami arm; left book 

ni'-vos-'V !'," , 'V ,,""' ■'""' ' '•' r the solar 

Plexus, correct delivery of a right nppercnt; 

?t.,t , ,"""*,' I "V" , """' ! " ri| -' ,,t 0PP-rcu t„ chin; 

..it f. ': ' T- Un! i "" 1 s " mli '"-' • i< rt in.,- 

io v'to n,i', "V ,""V "' '•■■' """ •>«»< b: 

h..w to train, rules for boxing, i .,„. 

No. 165— The Art of Fencing. 

VewY, It ", "" W '"'" k l,V ***>* -'" l] ' ■ *■"»•■■ "' 

ili. so T, o 'V," 1 " t»tructors i adlna authorities on 

in., subject. Messrs, Benac give in detail how evert 

•SMESfi&jzS!* v*»4 ■'""■■»•• 

fnil ,-,i. ',,'"''"'";""'■ " '" Ulnatrated with sixty 
io .ems. '""""-■ ; etally tor this k. PrlS 

N ?/ 1 ,^ 6 T" ow t0 Swi "9 Indian Clubs. 

of nhvsT?ai iiil 1 w ;','"'"•'". too well-to 

tfiszr* stfs-v'w 

No. 167 — Quoits 

SIS.. 5",..V,:l-s. ESS 

No. 170— Push Ball 

WeSnl ".! , .„ ll !,, :„. I b> dtanrtog. 

men This book ,. n a ns tie 

cf the ,.„m.-: mmSX*. Wcfw'cenu! ' "" >lCb 




CP© 



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^ SPALDING'S ATHLETIC LIBRARY Q 

No. 174 — Distance and Cross-Country Run- 
ning. 

Bj (Jcorge Ort.in, the famous T "n I v*Tt*J ty of Pennsyl- 
vania runner. Tells Imw in btcOOM proficient at the 
quarter, ii;iif, mile, the longer distances! and cr o s s 
. .ii Ni i> rannlBg and rteeplecnaaiiig, with Instructions 
tor training and schedules to Ih- observed when pre- 
paring for b contest, Illustrated with numerous pic- 
tures of leading athletes in action, with comment h by 
Tin- editor on the good and had points shown. Trice 
10 cents. 

No. 177— How to Swim. 

I!;. .1 II. Bterretti the leading authority on Swimming 
in America. The Instructions will interest the expert 

as well as the novice; the Illustrations were made from 
photographs especially posed, showing the swimmer in 
clear wster; a valuable feature is the series of "land 
drill" exercises for the beginner, which is illustrated 
by many drawings. The contents comprise: A plea for 
education in swimming; swimming as an exercise and 
for development ; la no! iirill exercises; plain swimming; 
best methods of learning; the breast stroke; breathing; 
under-arm sua eientilk strokes — over-arm side 

stroke; double over-arm or "trudgeon" stroke: touching 
and turning; training for racing; ornamental SWittV 
mlng; floating; diving; running Deader; back dive; div- 
ing feel foremost ; the propeller; marching on the 
swimming on the back. Prise bO seats. 

No. 178 — How to Train for Bicycling. 

dives methods Of the U-st rldetl when training for 
long or short distance races: hint a on training Re 

,!» In every particular. Trice Id etS. 

No. 180 — Ring Hockey. 

A new game for the gymnasium. Invented by Dr. 
j M. Vornees of Pratl institute, Brooklyn, that has 
sprung into instant popularity; us exciting as basket 
ball. This 1mm. k Contains OBftcisJ rubs. Trie.- in .cuts. 

No. 182— Ail-Around Athletics. 

in full the method Of BCOltag the All -Around 

championship, giving percentage tables showing what 
each man receives for each performance In each of the 
ten wants, it contains ss well Instructive srtlcles on 

Main for I he All Around < 'hamplnnshlp. illus- 
trated wiiii many pictures of champions m action and 

. at all -around meets. PriCS 1" cents. 

No. 185— Health Hints. 

les of articles bj Prof I B Vfsrman, the 
well-known lecturer ami authority <>w physical culture. 

Prof. Wurman treals very Interest Ingly of health In- 

i by Insulation; health Influenced by underwear: 
health Influenced by color; eserdss, who needs it? 

BtS. 

No. 264 — Roller Polo Guide. 

i i, v .1 C\ Morse, A full description of thfi 
Uirlnl rubs, pictures of teams; other srtlcles of 

Interest Prloe lo cents. 











G SPALDING'S ATHLETIC LIBRARY Q 

No. 188 — Lawn Hockey, Tether Tennis, Golf 
Croquet, Volley Ball, Hand Tennis, Gar- 
den Hockey, Parlor Hockey, Badminton. 
Containing the rules (or each game. Ill' 

Price i" cents. 

No. 189 — Rules for Games. 
Compiled by Jessie II Bancroft, director ..f physlcsj 

training, department ..r cation, New Y..rk City. 

These games are intended for use :,t recesses, and nil 

but the team games have I n adapted to large 

Suitable f,.r children from three to eight rears, and In- 
elnde :i great variety. Price in ci 

No. 191— How to Punch the Bag. 

i. Ifi ,i W ,'i , H ii ""I 1 '": 11 ("Yoong Corbetf). This I k 

is undoubtedly the best treatise on bag punching that 

baa «er been printed. , ty of blow us i 

training a shown and explah The pictures 

thirty-three full-page re „r Voung Corbetl 

"ncaPPfan w al , TO rk |„ M s tr g quarters. 

,'. - i;'";'"«^i'l,sv...,v taken by • apecial arils, and 

; ; ; - ■■■•-■> In »M other publication. Fancy bag 

' > '! '•'' I ! " « i' uown he, trical bag 

puncher, who shows the latest tricks. Price 10 cei 

No. 193— How to Play Basket Ball. 

<;. Me f r;,,","'''","",-, V' 1 "'"" " f ""' ,,lli '- i '' 1 Bagkel Ball 
,;„,'"" Instructions for players, i for 

11 s.,1 ,n B0TW "' '"""•" " f ""'- u <l<- and »pe- 

No. 194— Racquets, Squash-Racquets and 
Court Tennis. 

..;';,-,,, > ai pi g, 

each game »' "'"•' bl ™les for 

,.,,,, . ell-known o 

N ?h 19 ^-° fficial Roque Guide. 

iamVioS. Contain, ';■,.„' ',"'■ ,llirl '- ■'• '"'*• 

their ......r,,,,,,,, " P u . , ' ■» ' U; ■'■"■■■; the co ,H »„d 

".ies „„„ Tal)Ulbl i ,„ f ,-;;;; ii 

No. 199— Equestrian Polo Guide 
5W " s " ful ^A^MCmi 









SPALDING'S ATHLETIC LIBRARY Q 

No. 200 — Dumb-Bells. 

This is muli-iil.toill,, the beSl 1 k On ilumti-holls 

that has ever been offered. The author. Mr. <:. Bojus, 
was formerly Buperintendenl ot physical culture in the 
Bllzabeth (N. J.) public schools, Instructor a1 Columbia 
University (New xork), Instructor for four years nt 

the Colombia rammer scl I and is now proprietor of 

the Park Plaee Qymnasluia, ai ]i Park Place, New 

York City. Tiic I I. contains ~i>" photographs of all 

the various exercises with tin- Instructions In huge, 
readable typo, it should h<* In the hands of every 
teacher and pupil of physical culture', and is Invaluable 
fur home exereue us well. Price i*> routs. 

No. 201 — Lacrosse. 

By William c. Schmeleaer, captain .Toltns Hopkins 
Dnlrersll Ion Intercollegiate ucrosse team of 

1902; edited by Ronald T Abercrombie, ex-captain and 
coach of Johns Hopkins University lacrosse team, loon 
1904, Bvery position is thoroughly explained in a most 
simple and concise manner, rendering it the host 
manual of the game ever published, illustrated with 
immorous snapshots of Important plays. Price to eta. 

No. 202 — How to Play Base Ball. 

Edited by '1'. H. Humane, Now ami revised edition. 
Contents: How to become a batter, by Napoleon l*a- 
lole, James Collins, Hugh Jennings ami Jesse TannebUl; 
bj Jack Doyle ami Prank L. 
1 by James IS. Sullivan, 

Sec.'Treas. a A.U.: bow i good pitcher, by 

i . xouag, ■Kut"" Waddell ami Berl Cunningham: on 
curve pitching, by I James .1. Callahan, Frank 

Donahue, Vic Willis, William Dineen and Charley 

how !•• bei if as ?. by Eddie 

Phelps, William Sullivan ami M. J. Klttrldge; how t.i 
plsy tirsi base, by lluoji Jennings; bow to piaj 
base; by Napoleon Ledole and William Gleaaon; how- 
to play third has,., by James Collins ami Lave i'v"«: 
how to play shortstop, by Herman Long; how t,, play 
tin- Infield, bj \ Comlskey; bsw to play the 

outfield, by Fred Clarke: the earmarks or a hall player, 
by John J. MKJraw; good advice for players; how to 
organize a toam: how to manage a team; bow to score 

loo: i nplre ■ game; h«sc hall rulos Inter* 

oj o Pries 10 Ml 
No. 207 — Bowling on the Green; or, Lawn 

Bowls. 

iv equipment; how- 
to play the tamo and the official rules «s promulgated 

Edited by Mr. 
i illustrated. Price 10 cents. 

No. 208 — Physical Education and Hygiene. 
Is the fifth .if the Physical Training *■ 
H. Warman (see Nee, 143, I in. 166,. 186, 218, 
ta will show the 
„f mii.i- principles: longevity. 

Chapter u Hints •• ittag: feed values; the "«•■« of 

salt Chspter III Medicinal rail f certain foods. 

efficacy ..f sugar: -agar, fo'-l for 
uius.uUr work; i-atlug for strength uml en du r a nce ; uab 



%:* 





cv 



SPALDING'S ATHLETIC LIBRARY 



=3c= 



Chapter V— 
lour, Chapter 



as brHln food; food for the children 
Digestibility, bread; appendicitis due to Boor. Chapte 
VI— Hints on drinking -water, milk, buttermilk, tea 
coffee; how to remain young. Chapter VII — Hints on 
ImtliliiK; cold, hot, warm, tepid, salt. hud. nlr, Btnalan, 
Turkish, 'cabinet. Chapter V1I1— Hints on breathing; 
breatblewneH, heart strain, aecoad wind, yawning, the 
art of yogi. Price 10 cents. 

No. 209— How to Become a Skater. 

Contains advice for beginners; how to become a Ognre 
skater thoroughly explained, with man* diagrams 

showing how t „ii IhH different tricks of tl 

tare skaters. Including the Mohawk, with all Its 
variations; O s. forward and backward. Inside and 
outside; the crosscuts. Including the difficult Swedish 

f;?.,, . , ""I 1 "" l " 1 ' 1 '' intaa; the grapes with Its 

numerous branches, and many other Styles, which Will 

he comparatively simple to any who follows the 

directions given Protoaely illustrated with plctnres 
10 cents'. "'""'• r » «'"> numerous diagrams. 1TI. ;■ 

No. 213—285 Health Answers. 

U.n'o"rules f N ''""V;""-»-„ f"r exercise In the summer; 
"on »1 . ]'".Y I[ " K ' " h "" «° ln « »>hl"l »""">< 
lie a in. „. i, , ."?'"»: ventiiati,,,. a bedroom; ventllat- 
all." loin '•"''•l«l" pure air; bathing; salt water 
Water- to",,: , ""''"' """ r " r "'■ »«<«; drinking 

N °' Drm 8 3raded Cali8theni « and Dumb-Bell 

Ro B cnesZ*^V B 'Y W Tve'; r, .,! , ( hV " l ' - " , , ,,lr '' , " r L" ' *•■ 

has n tued In g •', „,„,? "'" ,V"' , "' , ">■<■"'■" 

a mass drill that w t '; '",' "«*»»» •■< baring 
felt. K.,r rear" i, I"'', '"'V'' 1 ' 1 '-'' " ">' " »" •-•» 
'""«t gymnasiums ,, " h ," '"""''llshe.1 custom In 

varhsl from " " "ea 'a ';,' , '; r ' Zl !' i: " "*« "">". »»™' 

?" 2 , 7 — 0, y"plc Handbook 

tor Olympic (;„,es '.h' , "■ '•»" Dike- 

of the Olympic <;,;„,, ,, f i Hi" 1 "". " ' "•''■ , - ^P"* 

and plcturea'of hZiV .,,:',,/•", j,,," l,h "« ■* reeorta 
the games of UM u „„ ',.,», pSl in " '"'"' M 

sv i o _. a, till |IJ * * fit H 

F-Trel! "oV tL'shan^'k ':"7'" P"'" '" '■'»»■<«. A. 
contains a complete oScrtnH™' 7,'" " r *''•""••"!. It 
points of a a-ood id., I . "' ""' Mme. it. origin 
tow g.me'l.*'Si y ed ,,, ; r i th !,, d 1 1 «" HWroctlT, artl, 

Illustrsted with plciure. ,r r Kr f,"'" "'"' " ffi,l "l ml** 
cents. Pictur,, of leading tesma. 1'rlce 10 










q SPALDING'S ATHLETIC LIBRARY 

. 233 — Jill Jitsu. 

Complete description of this famous Japanese sys- 
of ■etf-defence, Btacti more thoroughly explained 
iiiuHi rated with numerous fall-pace plctarei of 

smi s. A. Milium I and K. Koyama, two of the mod 

oua exponents of tbe art of Jta Jitsu, who posed 
ciiiily for this book. Be rare and ask for the Spald- 
Athletlc Library book on 71a Jitsu. Price 10 cents, 
, 234 — School Tactics and Maze Running. 
series of drills for Qui use of schools. Bdited by 
Atber Halaey Gullck, Director of Physical Train- 
la ill-' Nt-u Voik public schools. Price 10 cento. 

No. 236— How to Wrestle. 

Without Question the most eompleu and up-to-date 
book on wrestling that has ever been printed. Edited 
bj r. Et, Toombs, and deroted principally to special 
d Illustrations by Georges HsckSnschmldt, the 
•Russian Lion." It show* the champion in many 
i .] also contains ■ special article on "Training! 

En which be gives good advice to beginners. Tin 
■lOO 'on tn ins In addition many full pages of poses by 
Tom Jenkins and other famous wrestlers. Besides 
showing accurately how to secure each hold and fall, 
the book also contains official rules for ail styles "t 
wrestling, it*- sure to ask for the spaldlng Athletic 
Ubrsrj book "How to WTrsstls." Pries Id cents. 

No. 237 — Association Foot Ball. 

a complete and up-to-date golds to the "Kocker** 
bum In ths United States, containing Inatractlona for 
playing the gsme, official rules, and Interesting news 
from all parts of the Country. Illustrated with numer- 
ous pictures of leading hwrnn Pries 10 cents. 

No. 238 — Muscle Building. 

By Dr. L. II Onllck, Director of Physical Training 
in lbs New York public schools, a complete treatise 
on the correct method of acquiring muoeulor otrength. 

lllust rateil with runn r«.ua full page engravings. Price 

10 cents. 

| No. 239 — Official Intercollegiate A. A. A. 
Handbook. 
Contains constitution^ by lawa, lawn of uttiietics nnd 
I rules to govern the awarding "f the championship cup 
i of the Intercollegiate Athletic Association of Amateur 
I d Ictes "f Ami rit a, the governing body In college 

latblel tins ofllclsl Intercollegiate r rda from 

11876 to 1905, With Ho- winner's name and time In SSCh 

I event, list ..f points won bj each college, end n*t <<r 
is of the aasoclstlon f . LnoluslTS. 

| ; io cents, 

No. 240 — Spalding's Official Foot Ball Guide. 

i bj Walter Camp. Contains the new rule*. 

I with diagram lu*Americs teams as ■elected 

ling authorities; revlew i ><f the came from Yori- 

■ ions ..f the country; 1908 ■cores of all the 

■ I* of, etc.. and is sn tncy< 

In Itself. Fisher of Columbia I*rlce 10 cents. 





\ r ■ 




G SPALDING'S AT HLETIC L IBRARY^ 

No. 241— Official Handbook of the A.A.U. of 

the United States. 

The A.A.U. la the governing body .if athletes In the 

Doited State? of America, and all games musl be held 

mui.-r us rules, which are exclusively published in 

this band! k, and a copy should be in the bane at 

every athlete and every ,.|ul, officer In America. This 
book contains the official rules (or running, lumping, 
welghl throwing, hurling, pole vaulting, swimming, 
Mxlng, wrestling, etc., and Is an encyclopedia In ItseJZ 
Price 10 cents. 



No. 242— How to Play Foot Ball. 

Edited by Walter Camp, The contents embrace 
everything thai s beginner wants to know and man; 
points thai an expert will be glad to learn. The pic- 
tures are made from snapshots of lea, lie- teams and 
Players in action, with comments by Walter Camp. 
Price LO cents. 

No. 243— Official Basket Ball Guide. 

Edited by George T. Bepbron. Contains the De- 
vised official rules, decisions on disputed points, records 
oi promineni teams, reports on the fame from various 
pans oi the country, and picture of h Ireda ,,r play- 
ers. Price in cents. 






No. 244 — Golf Guide. 

Edited by Charles s. Cos Contains records <>f the 
Important American golf events since their Institution, 

■"-""is '■' of the game In various' 

parts of America portraits of promineni plan 
revised rales of the game. Price 10 cents! 

No. 245— Official Y.M.C.A. Hand-Book 
I'-'lifc.l by O. T Hepbron, tbe well-known sthletK 

authelll, n ■■ »« | |d al ,,,,,.„ ,..,„.,.,„„. all 1 

sports under the .,, ,,„. r . M .B. A . ,/,.,„„_ 

1 , -''..., y'",l'- ; ,f ,h Dh W •' directors , ,,f rc . Et < 

let r *. „f" ,l' I "'''l; 1 ' 1 '"-' ' ,,M '-*- I'eli. a. hlen rules, many 
^, mist V '';'■""- Y/Mf-A. a. I, le.es „, ,l,e ,■„,„,- 

v law" ,f ii, , , „ :i ; lll "' i " n "'"" ' ""rution and 

,1 ,„, test Hv ', '" '' '■;"'"■■ " f V M ' ' 

indoor teat, voile] l.all rules: ,, 




neir_ raax »it.n me da., „f e„mt,cUli..„ arrived iv,.„ 



JO cllltS. 



AM 





^ SPALDING'S ATHLETIC LIBRARY 

No. 247 — Collegiate Basket Ball Guide. 

The official publication of the Dew Collegiate Basket 
Ball Organization. Contains the official rules, collegiate 
ami high school records, nil Ajnerlca selections, re- 
views of the collegiate basket ball season of 1904-5, 
and pictures of all the prominent college teams and 
Individual players. Edited by Hurry A. Fisher of 
Columbia. Price 10 cents. 



A-**. 



tin 



No. 248 — Archery. 

A new and up-to-date h<i"U >>n this fascinating pas- 
time. Edited i.y Mr. Louis klaxson ol Washington, 
]i. c. ex-National champion. Contains a Motor} 1 ■•< 
archery from its revival aa a paatlme In the eighteenth 
century, t" the preaent time, with list of winners and 
■cores .,f the English Qrand championships from Ml; 
National Archery Association of the I'nited Statea 
winners and Korea; the several varieties of archery; 
tions for shooting; how t.. select Implements; 
how i" score; and a great deal "f Interesting Informa- 

'iii on the game. Illustrated. I'rice 10 cents. 



249 — How to Become a Bowler. 

Karpf, Secretary "f tin- American Bowling 

,-s«, and "i i' the best posted man on bowling 

ry of the aporl : diagrams 







No. 
By 

mill one of the hi 
.. Amerii a. I Contents lilstn . 
,.f effective deliveries; how to bowl; a few hints to be- 

gl rs: American Bowling Congress; the national 

championships; bow to build an alley; how to spore; 

how they are made. Rules for cocked bat, 

cocked hat and feather, quintet, battle game, nine 

up mill nine down, bead pin and four back, ten pins 

_li i pin ..in. five back, the Newport game, ten pin 

hi'itii pin game, duekpln game, head pin game. New 
England candle pin pun.-. Illustrated with portraits 
nf nil tin' prominent bowlers. Price l" tints. 

No. 250 — Official Athletic Almanac. 

Compiled by .1 B. Bulllvan, Chief Department 
, ;l l Culture, Louli ana Purchase Exposition, and Direc- 
tor Olympic Oames, 1904. Tli Iy annual publication 

now Issued thai contains h complete list of amateur 

■ hi-.. .. .n, |.i. i.. Intercollegiate r -'is: com- 

nwlminlug n 
. records; Irish, Scotch and Auati 

records; r.-ports ..f leading athletic n is: skating 

records: Important athletic events and nnmerous 

of Individual athletes end leading athletic teams. 

pries 10 cent*, 

No. 251 — Canadian Foot Ball Guide. 

Edited by Frank D. W Iworth, Sectetary-Treaeorer 

Ontario > ■"■ Tno omcjal book »f 

the game In Canada. Price 10 cents. 

No. 252 — How to Sprint. 

\ complete and detailed account >J bow to train for 
Every athlete who aspires to lie 
u sprinter ran study this book to advantage and tain a 
great d,-ai ol useful knowledge. Price lu eents. 








q SPALDING'S ATH LETIC LIBRARY n 

No. 253 — Official Handbook of the Public 
Schools Athletic League. 
This is the official handbook of the Public Behoi is 
Athletic League, which embrace* nil the pabllc 

of Creator Now Vork. It contain* the official rules that 
govern all the content* of the league, unci constitution. 
by-laws and officers. Edited l,y Dr. Lather Hnlscy 
riullck. superintendent of physical education In the New 
\ork public schools. UluBtrated. Price 10 cent*. 

No. 254 — Barnjum Bar Bell Drill. 

Bdlted by Dr. It. Tait McKenzie. Director Phy»leal 
I rain lug, I nlverslty of Pennsylvania. profusely Illus- 
trated. Price 10 cents. (Beady In May.) 

No. 255 — How to Run 100 Yards. 

Ily J. \V. Morton, the noted British champion. Wrlt- 
t t<5£ Morton during bis recent American trip. 

In I *«. especially for boy*. Mr. Morton know* bow to 
handle his subject, and his advice and direction* for 
attaining speed, will undoubtedly be of 1mm, „ 
} n Z,,,' I .'' f"""' m »J'"-lty of boys who have to r.lv 

on printed Instruction*. Many „f Mr. Morton'l method* 
L'» 'V"i "'-v-i to American athlete*, bnl hU 

with nh.? .! . "' . ,rl,mte t" tl't-Jr- Worth. Illustrated 
dally for thl* book, In New York City. Price 10 , t». 

No. 256— Official Handbook of the Ontario 
Hockey Association. 

oanotaWnl- W / £ , I eWltt - "' Toronto. ConUto* the 

eomootl.t Si , 1 | f . "J" Association, cost Itiltlon. rules ,,f 

™ P Price • 10 cen't* "'" a *' a P,CtUr " 8 " f l '"""" ! " la> - 

No. 258 — Indoor Base Ball 

in.h"'r r i r „m'!. n ^" >Ml . Kl " ne '" noW T|P| "K w " h ""»■' 
the nla " Z roi ? ." W nter ■""time. This book contain* 

te^stni article!; k„ pr t . t '' r0 " "' lpa,,,n * ' "'■ '""> "- 

leresting article* on the game. Price 10 cents. 

No. 259— Weight Throwing. 

thJower'Tt"! lioldl'r' 011 ; 1 ' A Ch » mp " >n American weight 

2nd g Ivc* TaTnal^'i. " ",""" '" » '"""-'.ctlve way, 
>.,,, » . V . ,u """'o' Information, not only for the novlc- 

EriMzJteSHHr^ 

.hot Putterfand „Il,'e r ra" ,, p r ^ ,l rS cent'..'''"" " h '" n, "" D 

N °- ^"-Official Basket Ball Guide for 
Women. 

cousin, & „ , ffl , c , ,., s ^ , ,"e. i r,r n s smi,h *""-" 

the Executive rSSmlttl*! oUtr*^"" V'"';! H 
on the following .object.: %££' fi?"^ "J«g 



<#""*8 




n h 






n SPALDING'S ATHLETIC LIBRARY n 

^" 'O 1 ' -■■• 

Hitchcock. Director <>f Physical Training* and Dean 
of College) Amherst < !o)lege; condition ->f women's 
basket ball in 1 1 j< - Middle West, by \V. I'. Bowen, 

.!i st;n.' Normal College; ;i few siiKgestiunH 
playing "i' basket imll, by Agnes c 
Chllds, A.M.. Smith College; psychological efn 
basket ball for women, by Dr. u ll. uulick, superta- 
tendi-nt of physical training in the schools of Greater 
v. w Vurk; physiological effects of Uiskrt imll. by 
Theodore Hough, Ph.D.; signifies nci el bull 

men, by Sends Berenson; relative merit "f the 
v.mi'.a, rules and by Augusts Lane 

Patrick, director of physical training, M on tela I r 
i \ ,i i High School; a Plea for Basket Ball, by Jnlle 
EUabee Sullivan, Teachers' College. New Vprk; diagram 
.if field. Illustrated with at basset bail 

Price UJ - 

No. 261 — Tensing Exercises. 

By Prof. D. B, Warman, and onlfonn with bis 
previous numbers on Scientific Physical TruinhiK (sea 

>|.:ilr|iim"s Al ■> ^"^ ! 12, I !'.', 186 Is,".. 20ft , 

i i in-" or "Resisting" system of urns 

erctses Is the most thorough, the most complete, 
1 1,.- most satisfactory and the i dating <>f ays 

tenia, only forty minutes are require* all the 

The in i unprtse nearly 7<> photo- 

graphs. PricS W truls. 

No. 262 — Medicine Ball. 

This book I« not a technical treatise, but a si-rb-* 
of plain and practical •■ • Ises with the medicine ball, 
suitable f"r I Iris, business and professional 

men, in and out ><f gynrossinma, Lengthy explanation 
tare barn been avoided and U- 
lusl nil Ions used Instead, The i .■ fascinating 

and attractlTe, and avoid an) semblance •<( drudgery. 
Rdlted by W. I. Cromie, physical director German- 
town (Pa.) v.m.c.a. Price lo cents. 

No. 265 — Spalding's Lawn Tennis Annual. 

Edited by H P. BurcheU of the Nevr X*ork Times. 

Include a report <>f every Important toarna* 

the Nml.. mil Ch 

actional and State tournaments; Invitation and 

open tournaments; Intercollegiate and luterscholastlc 

championships; women's national cbamplonslps; Cans- 

il foreign ehsmplonshlps; Indoor championships; 

I for nub year from 1888 to 1905; lawa 

, i.ihiIh; Insl iplng! decisions 

■ ii.il p-.inis; regulations (»r the managami 
tournaments. Pries H> rents. 







No. 266 — Spalding's Official Cricket Guide. 

Edited by Jerome Planner?. The most complete year 

| M ...k of the game that bus ever been published i" 

, it contains all the records <>f the prevtons 

year, reports «>f speclel offldal rules and 

pictures of nil ib*' leading learns and Individual play- 

Prlos l" truta. 



a SPALDING'S AT H LETIC LIBRARY Q 
An Encyclopedia of Base Ball 

Attention called to toe numbers of Spalding's 

Athletic Library on this and opposite page, embracing 
the greatest collection of hooka of Instruction rot play- 
ing the various positions In the game ever published, 
rhese books are entire!] new and up-to-date, and con- 
tain the latest uteth...ls ..f play. Bach number is com- 
plete in its.ii' and is profusely Illustrated. It" ^m- 
and ask for Spalding's Athletic Library. Price 10 
cents for each book. For detailed descriptloi 
following numbers: 




■J&. -» 










No. 257— Spalding's Official Base Ball Guide. 

The leading bus,, ball annua! of th ntry, and t Ik- 

official aathorltj ,,r the game. Kdlted bj Henry Chad- 
nick, tlf ''Father of Bus, Ball." Contains the official 
iduyniK rales, pictures of .ill the teams In the National. 

American and ml • leagues; official averages; reviews 

of the seas , nil the professional organizations: col- 
lege litis,- ball; early history of the game, and a great 
deal "t Information. Price 10 



No. 219— Ready Reckoner of Base Ball 
Percentages. 
To supply n demand for a b.u,k which would show 

the percentage of clubs nit! t recourse to the 

aranous work ,,i figuring, the publishers have had Mr. 

J. i. roster, s ting Editor .,r tbe New STork Evening 

relegram, compile a i k which answers ewry i ulre- 

!" , •" , ■ i "" 1 u h has mi t uiti, greatest praise for 

its accuracy and simplicity. No follower of the game 
without it. Price 10 ■ 





etui afford I,, |„ 



-4< 



No. 223— How to Bat. 

.JkLVT H, i ''M''' '''','' , |mr ' "' hilU ?•"»«»« nowadays. 

ttti.it of pitching, is batting, The team thai can bat 

in.r lias some good nit, hers ,■:,„ win base ball games; 

JhU denarii "V ' n'" 1 '' * 1 """' 1 """ >" 

this "jpartmenl ol the game, and there la no better 

,',! '.'i , '""'"",'''"-' !''' '>'•'" »">" ">y r Hag this book 

■"■" • nstan .v practising the mil,- tricks ra- 
Piai ■ therein. Price 10 Dents. 

No. 224— How to Play the Outfield 

°» « ""'-. '""1 this book explains the •all, I, " 

Prtc. SmmS """ VM& ' * lea<llui; °"«teW«S 





% -%J 



SPALDING'S ATHLETIC LIBRARY 



=0G= 



D 







*-*< 



Jlr * 



No. 225— How to Play First Base. 

No other; position to a ball team baa shown such a 
change for the better Lo recent years aa first 
klodincationa in tine with the betterment <»f Lhe sport 
in every department baa been made at Intervals, but 
in no other department have they been ao radical. No 
boy who play a the Initial Back can afford to overlook 
the points and bints contained In this book. Entirely 
new and ap-to-date. Illustrated with full-page pictures 
of Jill iii" prominent first basemen. Price 10 cents. 



No. 226— How to Play Second Base. 

are so tew men who can play second base i" 
on thai their names can easily be called "ft" by 
who follows the game "f base ball. Team own 

possess such players would not part with them 
for thousands "f dollars. These men have been Inters 
viewed and tbelr Ideas Incorporated In this book for 
the especial benefit of boys who want i" know the tint- 
points «>f play nt this point of the diamond, niuetrated 
with full-page pictures. Prlee 10 cents. 



No. 227— How to Play Third Base. 

Third basf is, in some fteepeets, (be moat important 
of the infield. No major league team lias ever won 
a pennant without I great third baseman. ColUns <>f 
the Boston Americans and Leach of Pittsburg are two 
of the greatest third bssemen the game has ever seen, 
and their teams owe muck "f the credit for pennants 
they have won to them. These men In this book 
describe just bovi thej play the position. Everything 
a player should know is clearly sel forth and any boy 
will surely Increase his chances of succeas by a careful 
reading of this book. Illustrated. Price 10 cents. 




No. 228 — How to Play Shortstop. 

Shortstop is dm "f lb.- hardest positions on tin- In- 
field ''» fill, and quick thought and quick action are 

a player, who expects to make g 
a shortstop. The views of every well-known player 
who covers ihiK position have been soughl In compiling 
this book, and it i» offered as being the most com 
pi.t<- book of its class ever produced. Illustrated. 
Price n> cents. 



No. 229— How to Catch. 

Undoubtedly tha best book on catching that has yet 
been published, ttvery boy who has Ropes of being 
ii clever catcher should read bow well-known players 
cover their position. Among the more noted ones 
who describe their methods of play In ibis book are 
Lou Criger "i the Boston Americans snd Johnnie KHnp 
of the Chicago Nationals. The nume res com 

prise all tin- noted catchers In (b»- big leagues. Pi 
10 cents. 









G SPALDING'S ATHLETIC LIBRARY n 

No. 230 — How to Pitch. 

A new, up-to-date book. No boy can afford i" be 
without a copy of It. Edited bj John if. Poster "f the 
Evening Telegram (New xork). The object "f this 
book is I., aid the beginners who aaplre t" become 

clever twlrlerg, and lis tenia are the practical 

teaching ..r men who have reached the top aa pitcher*, 
and who have had experience. Price id cents. 



No. 231 — How to Coach; How to Captain a 
Team; How to Manage a Team; How 
to Umpire; How to Organize a League. 
A useful guide to all who are Interested in tin- above 
subjects, .liininy Collins, manager-captain ••■ the Bos- 
ton Amer ican!, writes on coaching; it. .1. Kellj "f the 
St. Paul champions, on captaining; ai Buckenberger of 
the Rochester team, on managing; Frank Dwyer ..f the 
American League staff, on umpiring; Fred Lake mi 
minor leagues, and the editor, T. II. Murnane, Presi- 
dent of the New England League, on bow to organize 
a league, Price 10 cents. 





N ,°- 232 — How to Run the Bases. 

The important r base running as a scientific fea- 
ture' ,,r the national game is becoming more I more 

recognized each rear. r. , spectacular, 

or base Mealing nearly always agure In the winning 
or a tan,,.. Many a clc Is decided on the 

winning of that little strip ,.f 80 toei which lies be- 
tween CUSblonS. When hits are feu anil the . 

pitchers steady. It I mes Incumbent on the 

tenm to get around the bases in »r. Ef- 

fective stealing not only increases the effectives i 
the t.ani by advancing its manors without wasting 

hits, but it serves i,, materially dlscoi rl the enemy, 

and frequently has caused an entire opposing cluh to 
temporarily lose Its poise snd threw sway the game. 
This book gives clear snd concise directions fer ex- 
celling as a has,, runner; tells when I" ran ami when 
n..t to do so; h..w an.l when t,, slide; team work on 
the .bases; in fyct, every p., lot ,,f n„. rame Is ther- 
onghly explained. Illustrated with pictures of leading 
players. Trice ]i> cents. 








Spalding's Athletic Library is for sale by all | 

Athletic and Sporting Goods Dealers, 

Newsdealers and Department Stores. 



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